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Episode 59 : Introduction of Process Integration

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Episode 59 : Introduction of Process Integration
Pinch Diagram and Heat Integration


Reference: Notes from course on “Modelling, design and control for process integration”, CAPEC, August 2000 (R. Dunn)
SAJJAD KHUDHUR ABBAS
Ceo , Founder & Head of SHacademy
Chemical Engineering , Al-Muthanna University, Iraq
Oil & Gas Safety and Health Professional – OSHACADEMY
Trainer of Trainers (TOT) - Canadian Center of Human
Development

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Episode 59 : Introduction of Process Integration

  1. 1. SAJJAD KHUDHUR ABBAS Ceo , Founder & Head of SHacademy Chemical Engineering , Al-Muthanna University, Iraq Oil & Gas Safety and Health Professional – OSHACADEMY Trainer of Trainers (TOT) - Canadian Center of Human Development Episode 59 : Introduction of Process Integration
  2. 2. Introduction of Process Integration Pinch Diagram and Heat Integration Reference: Notes from course on “Modelling, design and control for process integration”, CAPEC, August 2000 (R. Dunn)
  3. 3. Process Integration Tools Allow Analysis of the “Enterprise” • The optimal allocation of mass and energy within a unit operation, process and/or site. • Optimal allocation can be based on economic, environmental or other important objectives. Heating Cooling Mass Integration (Mass Exchange Network – MEN) Energy Integration (Heat Exchange Network – HEN) Power Pressure ProductsFeed Stock By-ProductsSolvents Chemical Plant (Enterprise) Effluents Catalysts Spent MaterialsMaterial for Utilities (Water, Coal) Heating Power Cooling Pressure
  4. 4. Process Integration Techniques ReactiveMass Exchange ExchangeNetworks Networks (REAMEN’s) Mass Exchange Networks (MEN’s) Process Integration Process Integration Heat Exchange Networks (HEN’s) Combined Heat and Reactive Mass Exchange Networks (CHARMEN’s) Mass with Regeneration (MEN/REGEN) Reverse Osmosis Networks (RON’s) Heat-Induced Waste Minimization Networks (HIWAMIN’s) Energy-Induced Separation Networks (EISEN’s) Pervaporation Network’s (PERVAP’s) Waste Interception and Allocation Networks (WIN’s) Heat-Induced Separation Networks (HISEN’s) Energy-Induced Waste Minimization Networks (EIWAMIN’s)
  5. 5. 4 Heat Exchange Network (HEN) Want to Identify: – Optimal matching between hot and cold streams to minimize utility consumption – Minimum number of heat exchangers needed Plant Unit Operations Raw Materials Products & By-Products Hot Streams In Cold Streams In Cold Streams Out Hot Streams Out (Linnhoff, Grossmann et al, 1978-Present) A Heat Exchange Network is a System of One or More Heat Exchangers Hot and Cold Utilities Heat Exchanger Network
  6. 6. Therefore, 10x103 BTU/hr must be supplied from utilities (if there are no restrictions on temperature driving force) How can we check driving force restrictions? Second Law Analysis (You can not transfer heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature) 5 *Ref. Douglas, 1988, Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill Publishers, p. 218. Consider the problem of two hot stream and two cold streams: First Law Analysis (Conservation of Energy): Q  F Cp T  4000 BTU (200100)o F  400x103 BTU / hr hr o F Q  FCp T  1000 BTU (250 120)o F 130x103 BTU / hr hr o F 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 Calculate Q3 and Q4 Table 1* Stream Q available No. Condition FCp, BTU/(hroF) Tin Tout 103 BTU/hr 1 Hot 1000 250 120 130 2 Hot 4000 200 100 400 3 Cold 3000 90 150 -180 4 Cold 6000 130 190 -360 -10
  7. 7. Shifted Temperature Scales (using Table 1 data): 100 Hot Temperature Scale Cold Temperature Scale 250 240 200 150 190 140 90 Sources Sinks These streams need to be cooled These streams need to be heated
  8. 8. Temperature Interval Diagram (TID) Hot Temperature Scale Cold Temperature Scale 250 240 200 140 100 190 130 90 160 150 120 110
  9. 9. Net Energy Required at Each Interval Hot Temperature Scale Cold Temperature Scale Heat Duty Within Intervals Interval, i 250 240FCp 1000 4000 3000 6000 1000 Q 200 140 3 130 100 5 120 4 110 190 90 1 50 2 -40 160 150 -80 40 20 Total = -10 Q   (FCp)  (FCp) T Q  (1000 40003000 6000)(160140)  80x103 3 Q  (1000 4000 6000)(200160)  40x103 2 Q  (1000)(250 200)  50x103 1 cold,ii  hot,i  Therefore, i
  10. 10. Heat Transfer to and from Utilities for Each Temperature Interval Hot Temperature Scale 250 Cold Temperature Scale 240 50 200 190 Hot - 40 Cold 160 Utility Utility 150 140 130 120 110 100 20 90
  11. 11. Cascade Diagram Hot Temperature Scale Cold Temperature Scale 250 240 200 140 100 190 150 130 Pinch 90 160 50 -40 -80 50 Hot Utility Cold Utility10 70 0 40 40 20 60
  12. 12. 11 Hot Composite Curve Table 2* Hot streams, oF Cumulative H Since FCp values are constant, we could have replaced the calculation for H2, H3, H4 with a single expression: H2,3,4=(1000+4000)(200-120)=400,000 Temperature (oF) Plot Becomes the Hot Composite Curve Enthalpy (1000 BTU/hr) *Ref. Douglas, 1988, Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill Publishers, p. 218. T=100 H0=0 0 T=120 H1=4000(120-100)=80,000 80,000 T=140 H2=(1000+4000)(140-120)=100,000 180,000 T=160 H3=(1000+4000)(160-140)=100,000 280,000 T=200 H4=(1000+4000)(200-160)=200,000 480,000 T=200 H5=1000(250-200)=50,000 530,000
  13. 13. Hot Composite Curve 270 250 230 210 190 170 150 130 110 90 0 100 200 300 400 Enthalpy, 1000 BTU/hr 500 600 Temperature(degF)
  14. 14. Cold Composite Curve Table 2.3* Cold streams, oF Cumulative H Temperature (oF) Plot Becomes the Cold Composite Curve Enthalpy (1000 BTU/hr) *Ref. Douglas, 1988, Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes, McGraw-Hill Publishers, p. 218. T=90 H0=60,000 60,000 T=130 H1=3000(130-90)=120,000 180,000 T=150 H2=(3000+6000)(150-130)=180,000 360,000 T=190 H3=6000(190-150)=240,000 600,000
  15. 15. Cold Composite Curve 210 190 170 150 130 110 90 0 100 200 300 400 Enthalpy, 1000 BTU/hr 500 600 700 Temperature(degF)
  16. 16. Composite Curves 270 250 230 210 190 170 150 130 110 90 Temperature,degF Hot Composite Stream Cold Composite Stream at 10 deg F minimum temperature driving force 0 200 400 600
  17. 17. Composite Curves 270 250 230 210 190 170 150 130 110 90 Temperature,degF Hot Composite Stream Cold Composite Stream at 10 deg F minimum temperature driving force Cold Composite Stream at 20 deg F minimum temperature driving force 0 200 400 600
  18. 18. Composite Curves 270 250 230 210 190 170 150 130 110 90 Temperature,degF Hot Composite Stream Cold Composite Stream at 10 deg F minimum temperature driving force Cold Composite Stream at 20 deg F minimum temperature driving force 0 200 400 600
  19. 19. Composite “Pinch” Diagram Temperature Minimum Amount of Cold Utility Required Minimum Amount of Hot Utility Required Process to Process Heat Integration “Pinch” or Tminimum
  20. 20. Thanks for Watching Please follow me / SAJJAD KHUDHUR ABBAS
  • DeependraKumarYadav3

    Mar. 26, 2019

Episode 59 : Introduction of Process Integration Pinch Diagram and Heat Integration Reference: Notes from course on “Modelling, design and control for process integration”, CAPEC, August 2000 (R. Dunn) SAJJAD KHUDHUR ABBAS Ceo , Founder & Head of SHacademy Chemical Engineering , Al-Muthanna University, Iraq Oil & Gas Safety and Health Professional – OSHACADEMY Trainer of Trainers (TOT) - Canadian Center of Human Development

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