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Camera angles, shots and movements

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Camera angles, shots and movements

  1. 1. Today myself and Zoe have decided to look at different camera shots, movements and angles. We feel that by doing this it will prepare us more for the planning of our trailer when we come to filming it. By looking at the different types of shots, movements and angles we are able to see what ones look best and what we feel we be best to use in our horror trailer.
  2. 2. Today myself and Zoe have decided to look at different camera shots, movements and angles. We feel that by doing this it will prepare us more for the planning of our trailer when we come to filming it. By looking at the different types of shots, movements and angles we are able to see what ones look best and what we feel we be best to use in our horror trailer. Point of view shots- this is when the viewers are shown exactly what the characters within the film see and what they are looking at. This shot again makes the viewers feel involved in the film, as if they are part of it, this also builds suspense and will exaggerate the scariness of a horror as it is almost as if they are the victims themselves. We will use a few of these shots in our trailer as we feel that it will create tension and make the viewers feel as if they are a character within the trailer. An extreme long shot- these shots contains a large amount of landscape. They are often used at the beginning of a scene or a film to establish general location (setting).
  3. 3. Long shots- these contain landscape but give the viewers a more specific idea of setting. A long shot may show the viewers the building where the action will take place. We would like to use one of these short when the scary house/farm is first introduced in the trailer as we feel this shot will be good to exaggerate the horror impact of the setting. Mid shots- these shots contain the character(s) from the waist up. From this shot, viewers can see the characters' faces much more clearly as well as their interaction with other characters. This is sometimes also referred to as a social shot. We will use a lot of mid shots in our trailer as we want people to get an idea of our characters personalities from the trailer as this will make them more likely to want to watch our trailer.
  4. 4. Close up shots –this shot is only ever of one characters face. This enables the viewers to understand the actor's emotions and also allows them to feel empathy for the character. This is can also be referred to as a personal shot. When we come to filming our trailer we would like to use a few close-up’s on the villains face to exaggerate their psychological state, we feel this will be effective as it will frighten the audience and will enhance our trailers genre which is horror. Extreme close up shots- contains one part of a character's face or other object. This shot is quite common in horror films, this type of shot creates an intense atmosphere and provides interaction between the audience and the viewer. We might use one or two of these shots when a killing or other horror event is about to take place, we feel that this will be effective as it builds suspense and prepares the audience for something scary. Over the shoulder shots- these shots are from behind a character, they are as if you are literally looking over their shoulder, they are effective as it makes the viewers feel involved in the film as if they are there. We have already decided that we definitely want to use this shot in one of our scenes when the characters pull up at the house/farm, this is because we feel it will make the audience feel involved and like they are a part of it.
  5. 5. A bird's eye angle- this is an angle that looks directly down upon a scene. This angle is often used as an establishing angle, along with an extreme long shot, to establish setting. A high angle- this is a camera angle that looks down upon an object/character. A character shot with a high angle will look vulnerable or small. These angles are often used to demonstrate to the audience a perspective of a particular character. We might use this angle when filming our trailer, if we do then we will more than likely use it on the victim as this will exaggerate how vulnerable and helpless they are. An eye-level angle- this angle puts the audience on an equal footing with the character/s. This is the most commonly used angle in most films as it allows the viewers to feel comfortable with the characters. We will mainly use this angle before any of the horrific events occur as the audience aren’t supposed to feel comfortable when they are happening.
  6. 6. A low angle- this is a camera angle that looks up at a character. This is the opposite of a high angle and makes a character look more powerful. This can make the audience feel vulnerable and small by looking up at the character. This can help the responder feel empathy if they are viewing the frame from another character's point of view. We will use this angle when focusing on the villain as this will exaggerate their power and the victim’s weakness. A Dutch angle- this angle isn’t as well-known as the others, it is used to show the confusion of a character. We aren’t likely to use this angle in our trailer as it is a horror so this angle isn’t very appropriate.
  7. 7. A crane shot - this type of movement is often used by composers of films to signify the end of a film or scene. The effect is achieved by the camera being put on a crane that can move upwards, as we don’t have the equipment to capture an effective crane shot we won’t be likely to use one in our trailer, however they are very effective and show the viewers the setting as well as the characters. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4c-tJ76j48 This is an example of a crane shot from the well known film ‘Happy go lucky’. A tracking shot and a dolly shot- these shots have the same effect. A tracking shot moves on tracks and a dolly shot is mounted on a trolley to achieve the effect in the example above. This camera movement is used in a number of ways but is most commonly used to explore a room such as a restaurant. By using a tracking shot or a dolly shot the composer of a film gives the viewer a detailed tour of a situation. It can also be used to follow a character. Again, as we are unfortunately not able to have the required equipment for this, we won’t be able to use these shots, but will try and impersonate something similar with the equipment we are able to find. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDZZ5oqpsIg This is an example of a tracking shot, it is a shot of a man riding his skateboard and the camera follows him on his journey. Panning- this shot is used to give the viewer a panoramic view of a set or setting. This can be used to establish a scene, therefore we will try and use this shot a lot, especially when a new setting is introduced. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBLQbOG8Z1Y This is a panning shot of New York Skyline.

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