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Used at the "Internet of Energy" workshop in the Internet of Things Conference 2010, in Tokyo.

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Trend of the ICT Standardization

  1. 1. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 1 Trend of the ICT Standardization Shoichi Sakane Japan Technology & Research Center Cisco Systems 2010/11/29
  2. 2. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 2 Today’s story   Smart Objects are Everywhere   The Common Infrastructure   Trend of the IETF Standardization 22
  3. 3. Smart Objects are Everywhere
  4. 4. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 4 Sensor & Control Networks are everywhere Improve Productivity Healthcare Improve Food and H2 O Data Center Energy Saving Enhanced Safety & Security Smart House High-Confidence Transport and Asset Tracking Intelligent Buildings Predictive Maintenance Smart Grid Smart Community
  5. 5. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 5 Smart + Connected Communities Smart Metering Environmental monitoring ITS (Intelligent Transport System) Physical security Disaster prevention / management Local / global governmental facilities Social Networking Health monitoring Applications
  6. 6. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 6 2011 201320091997 20072005200320011999 Business Internet Phase 1 Consumer Internet Phase 2 Collaboration Video Virtualization/ Data Center Industrial Internet Phase 3 Healthcare Education Real Estate Transportation Digital Signage Utilities (Energy) Physical Security Government Sports 1 Trillion Smart Objects in the “Internet of Things”
  7. 7. The Common Infrastructure
  8. 8. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 8 The PAST of Smart Object Networks   Closed architecture and proprietary protocols are used Zigbee, Z-Wave, Xmesh, SmartMesh, MeshScape, … Different Protocols, Different Architectures   Results in inefficient and fragmented networks GW GW GW GW GW GW GW GW   Interoperability partially addressed by protocol gateways Inherently complex to design, difficult to converge Expensive and difficult to manage (CAPEX and OPEX) Inconsistent routing, lack of end-to-end QoS Deployments were limited in scale and flexibility GW GW GW GW GW
  9. 9. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 9 Using IP Allows consistent architecture   Based on open standards Move away from proprietary and closed protocols   Flexibility in many dimensions Support a wide range of Applications -- voice, video, data, message Media – Serial, SONET, Ethernet, DWDM, FR, ATM Devices -- From sensors to routers   Plug & Play, Interoperability and Scalability The Internet comprises billions of connected devices IP
  10. 10. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 10 Characteristics of “Smart Object” in the IoT   Constraints of the devices Power consumption Physical size CPU power (8 or 16-bit, lower clock) RAM (~100 KB) Bandwidth (~ 127kbps a frame)   Constraints of the networks Low-speed highly unstable loosy links oscillation avoidance Potentially very large scale (10-100sK nodes) Sleeping devices Unattended devices in harsh environments heat, dust, moisture, interference Low power and Resource Consideration Comprehensive & Simple Application Protocol Resilient Routing Protocol Adaptation Layer for new media Challenge Areas
  11. 11. Trend of the IETF Standardization
  12. 12. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 12 What is IETF ?   SDO of the Internet protocols   An open standards organization   Any discussion, mail and slides are open   No formal membership or membership requirements   All participants and managers are volunteers   Involving people not companies   Motto: “We reject kings, presidents and voting. We believe in rough consensus and running code”, Dave Clark (1992)   8 Areas, currently 124 WGs http://www.ietf.org
  13. 13. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 13 Internet of Things IoT Bar-Bof IETF77, Mar 2010 Constrained Envinronments core WG IETF76, Nov 2009 Z-Wave Zigbee IP Trend of the sensor networks in IETF Low power and Lossy Networks roll WG IETF71, Mar 2008 Low Power WiFi PLC Zigbee/HomePlug, Autumn 2008 OpenSG/UCAlug, Summer 2009 IEEE802.15.4-2003, Autumn 2003 Zigbee & WiFi collaboration, Sprint 2010 SmartGrid Bar-BoF, Autumn 2009 IEEE 802.15.4 6lowpan WG IETF61, Nov 2004 LoWPAN EISA ACT, 2007 Low power and Resource Consideration Comprehensive & Simple Application Protocol Resilient Routing Protocol Adaptation Layer for new media
  14. 14. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 14 Protocols for Smart Objects IEEE 802.3 Etherenet, 802.11 WiFi IEEE 802.15.4 PLC IPv6 TCP UDP HTTP COAP PANA IEEE 802.15.4g RPL 6lowpan- nd … LWIP BoF TLS DTLS Diet IKE IPsec 6lowpan-hc : Group : Protocol SEP 2.0 Application Trans port Internet Inter face
  15. 15. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 15 Smart Power Directorate   Organized in 2008, Requested by NIST   SGIP PAP01 Liaison   Internet Protocols for the Smart Grid Described a set of the protocols in the Internet for the the Smart Grid Explanation of the basic element of the TCP/IP technology Consideration of the addressing Consideration of the mix use of IPv6 and IPv4 Routing (OSPF,ISS,BGP,DYMO,OLSR,RPL) Transport protocol (TCP,UDP,SCTP,DCCP) Infrastructure requirement (DNS, DHCP) Security consideration Notification of installation of NAT and Firewall draft-baker-ietf-core-08 http://tools.ietf .org/html/draf t-baker-ietf -core-08
  16. 16. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 16 IPSO   Alliance established in September, 2008  over 50 organizations (Oct 2010)   Mission  Promote the use of IP in Smart Objects  Generate tutorials, white papers and highlight use cases  Support IETF and other standards development organizations  Support and organize interoperability events http://ipso-alliance.org/resource-library •  Formal Liaison •  IPv6 Forum •  Zigbee Alliance •  On-Going Activities •  Interoperability testing •  Tutorials, Webinars •  IPv6 ready certification for Smart Objects
  17. 17. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco ConfidentialPresentation_ID 17 Conclusion   Smart Objects are everywhere, and become connected into the networks.   Proprietary and closed architecture approach is not scalable, flexible nor interoperable.   The Internet is able to be a common infrastructure.   Applying the ICT enables scalability, flexibility, and interoperability.   The technologies for the networks are standardized soon.   IPSO will help you to make your system conformed with IP.

Used at the "Internet of Energy" workshop in the Internet of Things Conference 2010, in Tokyo.

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