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WHY CAN IT BE SO DIFFICULT?
Teenagers are going through physical and emotional changes
– including changes in their brains

What do
these
changes
affe...
• Teenagers are in a “transition age.” They are not young children (as they
will so eagerly remind us) and they are not ye...
ARE TEENAGERS ALWAYS
HORRIBLE?
HOW CAN WE IMPROVE THE
EXPERIENCE OF TEACHING
TEENAGERS?
THE FIRST DAY OF THE SEMESTER
It is in the first
few lessons
that students
make
subconscious
decisions
about the
teacher a...
“Good Cop VS Bad Cop”
Research shows that teenagers prefer disciplined teachers, and get higher
results in their classes. This does NOT mean tha...
SET SHORT-TERM GOALS
For many of us a year can go buy very quickly, but this is not true
for our students

The goal is to,...
HOW CAN I MAKE THEM
WANT TO LEARN?
Joke with them! It’s okay to have laughter in your
class. If students work hard, then you can relax a
little bit together....
Make sure that you’re teaching them things that they
can use in REAL life. If teenagers feel like their time
is being wast...
TALKING TO YOU IS GOOD, BUT
LET’S GET SOME REAL PRACTICE
NOW!
Teaching teenagers
Teaching teenagers
Teaching teenagers
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Teaching teenagers

Short presentation on teaching teenagers. Recognizing the difficulties that exist, and suggestions on how to overcome them and enjoy the experience.

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Teaching teenagers

  1. 1. WHY CAN IT BE SO DIFFICULT?
  2. 2. Teenagers are going through physical and emotional changes – including changes in their brains What do these changes affect? • Decision making • Planning • Control of their emotions • Empathy • Understanding of other people’s facial expressions
  3. 3. • Teenagers are in a “transition age.” They are not young children (as they will so eagerly remind us) and they are not yet adults (though they sometimes think they are) • The changing levels of hormones in their bodies make them moody and unpredictable • They would prefer to be anywhere else in the world, as long as they are not in class • Their peers affect them more than we do • Their friends or family might see English as a “useless” subject
  4. 4. ARE TEENAGERS ALWAYS HORRIBLE?
  5. 5. HOW CAN WE IMPROVE THE EXPERIENCE OF TEACHING TEENAGERS?
  6. 6. THE FIRST DAY OF THE SEMESTER It is in the first few lessons that students make subconscious decisions about the teacher and the class Make it very clear that YOU are in charge, but that you can also be relaxed and friendly The students must understand what you expect from them, and what type of help they can expect from you
  7. 7. “Good Cop VS Bad Cop”
  8. 8. Research shows that teenagers prefer disciplined teachers, and get higher results in their classes. This does NOT mean that we should be evil dictators, though. Teenagers need discipline because they are not mature enough to make responsible decisions all of the time. It is our job to decide when the class needs to work hard, and when we can have some fun. We need to strike a balance. Teenagers need discipline, but they also need to feel happy, secure, valued and motivated to learn.
  9. 9. SET SHORT-TERM GOALS For many of us a year can go buy very quickly, but this is not true for our students The goal is to, obviously, pass the final exam, but for many teenagers that goal will not feel “real” until 6-8 weeks before Using module checks, monthly quizzes, extended assignments and other techniques, we can keep them motivated and working hard. They should ALWAYS be working towards a goal. The goals we set must be VERY clear to the students, and we should negotiate with them. Giving them a tiny bit of control can help them feel more motivated to complete the tasks
  10. 10. HOW CAN I MAKE THEM WANT TO LEARN?
  11. 11. Joke with them! It’s okay to have laughter in your class. If students work hard, then you can relax a little bit together. Be aware of what types of activities your students like and dislike. No course book will be “just right” for your class, so adapt activities and get creative For example, if your students HATE gap-fill activities, adapt the text into a jigsaw-reading or running-dictation to make it more interesting
  12. 12. Make sure that you’re teaching them things that they can use in REAL life. If teenagers feel like their time is being wasted they will become completely unresponsive. Explain to your students WHY you are doing things. They are more likely to participate if they know and understand the reason for doing certain activities. Make sure to use topics that they are interested in. At the beginning of the semester ask them questions about their hobbies and interests, and then use that information to help you plan your lessons.
  13. 13. TALKING TO YOU IS GOOD, BUT LET’S GET SOME REAL PRACTICE NOW!

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