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Designing using Enriched Storytelling

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Presented at Web Directions South 2010, this talk covered how designers can use storytelling techniques to prototype complex, high-level concepts.

Published in: Design
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Designing using Enriched Storytelling

  1. 1. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Enriched storytelling. @thoughtpod
  2. 2. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Design communication?
  3. 3. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Why stories are a design tool
  4. 4. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Stories can do things implicitly that description can’t.  context, and  scaffolding They can stand as a conceptual prototype of a solution.
  5. 5. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING They contextualise a design
  6. 6. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Context is necessary
  7. 7. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Context is influential. from Apollo 8 crew, NASA
  8. 8. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Stories can take complexity... and provide a scaffolding.
  9. 9. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Stories can take complexity... and provide a scaffolding. User experience layer Finds out about a new service Calls to register Call centre rep conducts POI Discuss circumstances to determine eligibility. Registration. Week later, receives confirmation letter and welcome pack. User interface layer Process layer Information layer Product layer Societal control layer The ‘story’ bit’ The ‘enriched’ bit’
  10. 10. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Stories can take complexity... and provide a scaffolding. The ‘story’ bit’ The ‘enrich bit’
  11. 11. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Making enriched stories
  12. 12. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING
  13. 13. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING
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  15. 15. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING
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  17. 17. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING
  18. 18. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING User experience layer The “what’s actually different” layer The architectural detail
  19. 19. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Focus on the future system in the wild. Time Jan Jul Jan Jul Construction complete Deployment complete System in use
  20. 20. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING people things channels process location Time & sequence messaging Systems & tech Scope should include everything that the scope should include – no more and no less. Cultural change
  21. 21. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING The user experience should lead the story – and become a scaffold for the architecture. Finds out about a new service Calls to register Call centre rep conducts POI Discuss circumstances to determine eligibility. Registration. Week later, receives confirmation letter and welcome pack.
  22. 22. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING The story should use a visual and a textual taxonomy. Week later, John checks his email, and finds a message from the agency. He opens it and [etc etc] Email
  23. 23. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING The what’s different layer should articulate the key changes, not every change. And if possible, they should be tied to benefits and risks* – user and business. Week later, John checks his email, and finds a message from the agency. He opens it and [etc etc] Email, rather than paper- based correspondence decreases the registration turnaround time and reduces mailout/printing costs. Email * it’s a design prototype, not a sales job.
  24. 24. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING The architecture layer should show the key assets – systems, processes, user interfaces. They can get more technical, but usually only in later iterations. Week later, John checks his email, and finds a message from the agency. He opens it and finds it contains an appointment time, which updates his online calendar [etc] Email, rather than paper- based correspondence decreases the registration turnaround time and reduces mailout/printing costs. Email Auto email facility – generates emails based on case note. Calendar – updated based on authenticated link-click. Previous scenes in the story
  25. 25. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING What’s different? Providers able to integrate calendars with her. Sue can keep track of complex content and contacts easily – no more post-its and scrawls on random paper Sue feels in control. What’s different? Pathway approach – Sue has help navigating systems and reactions, so that they become more predictable. What’s different? Information management and synthesis begins immediately, not retrospectively. There’s continuity in the response. Person diagnosed with a heath issue registers and uses HealthNavigator.org.au to manage their response. 1 Health issue emerges Sue develops a set of symptoms that begin to recur. 2 Diagnosis and HealthNav referral Sue visits her GP, who diagnoses her with a serious condition. Her GP suggests she use HealthNavigator to manage her health response. 3 Registering for HealthNavigator Sue registers and starts using the functionality immedately. Setting up Health Plan She sets up her health plan, learning about benefits, support groups, coping strategies (presented as pathways to be followed) and adding in contacts (people, institutions and websites) Managing health response She begins using the system to keep notes of her conversations, and asks providers to email her appointment invitations to her HealthNavigator email (which auto- adds them to her calendar. She also creates appointments herself, as well as calendarising upcoming events (eg test results). Her HealthNavigator to-do list grows in the first week, but begins to shrink after the second. Sharing Access Sue gives her husband access to her account, and they begin to share the management of her response. 4 5 Userexperience Sue, the patient: Learn about her condition, and the available support infrastructures Manage her health response so she can keep track of everything. Bianca, Sue’s GP: Help Sue get well Refer Sue to tools that can help her. Email invite UIConcepts What’s different? GP educated to provide advice on response management, rather than just treatment. What’s different? Family members more involved in a structured way. Everyone – support, carers, etc – using the same source of information.
  26. 26. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING HealthNavigator.org would be available to users based on referral from a medical practitioner, to help them through the ‘crisis’ part of their diagnosis, and ongoing to assist them in managing their response. It could be delivered to their computer, their phone, their personal management software (eg Outlook), and to paper prints, to make sure that they have it on hand as needed in the most useful form possible for a range of circumstances. I need help with… I can’t find my… I just need to talk to someone … Integrated support and counselling service Phone help
  27. 27. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Simple one-pager…tells a story in a single page, describing key people, systems, processes, UI features, business outcomes. Don’t just tell the design decision makers – show them, warts and all. Get beyond the hype and the confusion! Some examples…
  28. 28. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Some examples… Full scenario spelling out the design, including: • High-level overview • Persona • Stepped process • User impact lenses
  29. 29. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Some resources… Sun Microsystems’ designstories.org Istockphoto, fotolia etc Balsamiq, InPresoScreens (prototyping) Illustrator, Photoshop, Powerpoint (yes, Powerpoint)
  30. 30. DESIGNING USING ENRICHED STORYTELLING Working the process… Understand the context Learn about the context, systems, users, and the desired business outcomes Find the senior sponsor Understand the issues and solve them, review regularly, escalate, add value Pick the right brains Facilitated workshops, interviews, project meetings, documentation, user discovery Partner with the team Build strong relationships, share the work, build a sense of contribution and ownership Get something out EARLY, review, iterate, repeat Have a deadline and an event Senior stakeholder commitment v. important
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