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Truth In Immigration 2012

This presentation provides documented facts and figures on immigration to the U.S., including data on crime, jobs, social services, benefits and more. Each slide contains a footnote that identifies the original source document so skeptics can check the data themselves.

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Truth In Immigration 2012

  1. ImmigrationFactsWhat Every Citizen Needs to Know 1
  2. “A salient characteristic of the current debate on U.S. immigration policy is the high ratio of hot air to data.” Dr. Douglas Massey Co-director, Mexican Migration Project Princeton UniversitySource: “Crossing The Border, What We Learned From The Mexican Migration Project,” Durand, Jorge and Douglas S. Massey,, p. 1. 2
  3. Immigration Quiz: True or False? Increase amount of crime Take jobs from Americans Don’t pay any taxes Strain health care & education systems Increase terrorism threat 3
  4. Immigration Quiz: True or False? Won’t enter legally Don’t assimilate, learn English, respect culture No Constitutional Rights Come here to vote illegally Threaten our sovereignty 4
  5. What people believe 5
  6. 67% Believe they won’t assimilate or learn EnglishSource: Zogby American Poll, April 2006 6
  7. 52% Believe they strain health care, education and social servicesSource: Pew Hispanic Center, The State of American Public Opinion on Immigration in Spring 2006 7
  8. 49% Believe they don’t pay taxesSource: Benson Strategy Group, Immigration Opinions Poll, May 9-12, 2009 8
  9. 48% Believe they threaten our sovereigntySource: Pew Hispanic Center 2006 Immigration Survey, February 8-March 7, 2006 9
  10. 39% Believe they increase the crime rateSource: FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll, 6 April 06 10
  11. 35% Believe they take jobs from AmericansSource: Time Magazine Poll, March, 29-30, 2006 11
  12. 31% Believe they increase the threat of terrorismSource: Opinion Dynamics Fox News Poll, April 25-26, 2006 12
  13. 20% Believe they won’t enter the country legallySource: Benson Strategy Group, Immigration Opinions Poll, May 9-12, 2009 13
  14. “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth gets its boots on.” Charles Haddon Spurgeon 19th Century Minister 14
  15. Race 15
  16. U.S. Census Bureau racial classification for all Hispanics who are not clearly Black, American Indian or AsianSource: Census 2000 Brief, "Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin." 16
  17. White U.S. Census Bureau racial classification for all Hispanics who are not clearly Black, American Indian or AsianSource: Census 2000 Brief, "Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin." 16
  18. What the term “Hispanic” really refers to in the U.S. Census Bureau classification systemSource: Census 2000 Brief, "Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin." 17
  19. Ethnicity What the term “Hispanic” really refers to in the U.S. Census Bureau classification systemSource: Census 2000 Brief, "Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin." 17
  20. What the proper translation of the word “La Raza” means in contextSource: The Translation of Our Name: National Council of La Raza 18
  21. “The People” What the proper translation of the word “La Raza” means in contextSource: The Translation of Our Name: National Council of La Raza 18
  22. Legality 19
  23. The type of offense for entering the U.S. at an “improper time or place”Source: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 20
  24. Civil The type of offense for entering the U.S. at an “improper time or place”Source: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 20
  25. The penalty for entering the U.S. at an “improper time or place”Source: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 (b) 21
  26. $50-$250 The penalty for entering the U.S. at an “improper time or place”Source: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 (b) 21
  27. Point at which improper entry becomes a criminal offenseSource: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 (a)(3) 22
  28. False Papers Point at which improper entry becomes a criminal offenseSource: USC 18, Title 12, Subchapter 2, Part VIII, Section 1325 (a)(3) 22
  29. States in which being in the country without papers is a Felony 23
  30. AZ, GA, ALStates in which being in the country without papers is a Felony 23
  31. The year Mexican immigrants would have had to apply for entry visas in order to receive them in 2011Source: Visa Bulletin Vol. IX, no. 32,. U.S. Department of State, May 2011. 24
  32. 1992 The year Mexican immigrants would have had to apply for entry visas in order to receive them in 2011Source: Visa Bulletin Vol. IX, no. 32,. U.S. Department of State, May 2011. 24
  33. Percentage of undocumented entries from Mexico offset by departures between 1965 and 1985Source: Massey & Singer, New Estimates of Undocumented Mexican Migration and the Probability of Apprehension, 1995 25
  34. 85% Percentage of undocumented entries from Mexico offset by departures between 1965 and 1985Source: Massey & Singer, New Estimates of Undocumented Mexican Migration and the Probability of Apprehension, 1995 25
  35. Percentage of undocumented immigrants who overstayed a legal visa in 2006Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Modes of Entry for the Unauthorized Migrant Population, May 2006 26
  36. 45% Percentage of undocumented immigrants who overstayed a legal visa in 2006Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Modes of Entry for the Unauthorized Migrant Population, May 2006 26
  37. Percent of in-country overstay leads deemed credible and forwarded to ICE for investigation in 2008Source: DHS, “Department of Homeland Security Annual Performance Report Fiscal Years 2008 - 2010,” p. 31. 27
  38. 25% Percent of in-country overstay leads deemed credible and forwarded to ICE for investigation in 2008Source: DHS, “Department of Homeland Security Annual Performance Report Fiscal Years 2008 - 2010,” p. 31. 27
  39. Average number of unauthorized immigrants from Mexico arriving annually March 2007 to March 2009Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010, p. 10. 28
  40. 150,000 Average number of unauthorized immigrants from Mexico arriving annually March 2007 to March 2009Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010, p. 10. 28
  41. Percentage of total U.S. population estimated to be undocumentedSource: Dept. of Homeland Security, Center for Immigration Statistics 29
  42. 3.7% Percentage of total U.S. population estimated to be undocumentedSource: Dept. of Homeland Security, Center for Immigration Statistics 29
  43. Years a naturalized citizen from Mexico may have to wait to bring their spouse into the U.S.Source: American Immigration Lawyers Association, AILA Backgrounder: Myths and Facts in the Immigration Debate 30
  44. 10 Years a naturalized citizen from Mexico may have to wait to bring their spouse into the U.S.Source: American Immigration Lawyers Association, AILA Backgrounder: Myths and Facts in the Immigration Debate 30
  45. Years the undocumented parents of a U.S. citizen will have to wait to legally become U.S. citizensSource: Calculations based on existing U.S. Law and historical immigration processing times. 31
  46. 38 Years the undocumented parents of a U.S. citizen will have to wait to legally become U.S. citizensSource: Calculations based on existing U.S. Law and historical immigration processing times. 31
  47. Birthright FallacySource: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  48. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C y Fami l e n’s itiz rC no Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  49. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C y Fami l e n’s itiz rC no Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  50. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C y Fami l e n’s itiz rC no Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  51. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C mi l y Penalty Fa e n’s itiz rC no Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  52. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C mi l y Penalty Wait Fa e n’s itiz rC no Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  53. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C mi l y Penalty Wait Fa e n’s itiz rC no Penalty Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  54. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C mi l y Penalty Wait Fa e n’s itiz rC no Penalty Wait Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  55. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C Fami l y Penalty Wait 38 years e n’s itiz rC no Penalty Wait Mi ling s Sib en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  56. Birthright Fallacy se Spou en ’s C i ti z nt Pare d or h il rC no ’s Mi ibli ng iz en n ’s SCi t i tize C Fami l y Penalty Wait 38 years e n’s itiz rC Mi no ib ling s Penalty Wait 53 years S en C itiz n or 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60 Mi Years Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service 32
  57. Population Growth 1990-2009 United States Hispanic Origin 400,000,000 300,000,000 200,000,000 100,000,000 0 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Source: U.S. Census Bureau, State & County QuickFacts, 2010 33
  58. Population Growth 1990-2009 United States Hispanic Origin 400,000,000 300,000,000 200,000,000 100,000,000 0 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Source: U.S. Census Bureau, State & County QuickFacts, 2010 33
  59. Population Growth 1990-2009 United States Hispanic Origin 400,000,000 15% 15.4% 15.8% 16.3% 13% 14.1% 14.8% 300,000,000 12.5% 10% 10.6% 11.2% 9% 9.5% 200,000,000 100,000,000 0 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Source: U.S. Census Bureau, State & County QuickFacts, 2010 33
  60. Crime 34
  61. Estimate of all Arizona crimes committed by undocumented immigrantsSource: ASU Incarceration Study, 2006 35
  62. 4.4% Estimate of all Arizona crimes committed by undocumented immigrantsSource: ASU Incarceration Study, 2006 35
  63. Percent of all undocumented immigrants DHS deported from Arizona with prior criminal recordsSource: DHS, Fact Sheet: Arizona Border Control Initiative – Phase II, March 30, 2005 36
  64. 3.48% Percent of all undocumented immigrants DHS deported from Arizona with prior criminal recordsSource: DHS, Fact Sheet: Arizona Border Control Initiative – Phase II, March 30, 2005 36
  65. Percent of MCSO arrests of undocumented immigrants as percent of total arrestsSource: MCSO web site and press releases 37
  66. 2.1% Percent of MCSO arrests of undocumented immigrants as percent of total arrestsSource: MCSO web site and press releases 37
  67. Percent of all people booked into MCSO jails subject to an ICE “hold”Source: M. Kiefer, Arizona Republic, Feb. 25, 2008 38
  68. 10% Percent of all people booked into MCSO jails subject to an ICE “hold”Source: M. Kiefer, Arizona Republic, Feb. 25, 2008 38
  69. Percent drop in violent crime as undocumented population grew between 1994-2006Source: U.S. DoJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Key Facts At A Glance, March 29, 2010 39
  70. 52.5% Percent drop in violent crime as undocumented population grew between 1994-2006Source: U.S. DoJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Key Facts At A Glance, March 29, 2010 39
  71. Percent drop in property crime as undocumented population grew between 1994-2006Source: U.S. DoJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Key Facts at a Glance, March 29, 2010 40
  72. 48.6% Percent drop in property crime as undocumented population grew between 1994-2006Source: U.S. DoJ, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Key Facts at a Glance, March 29, 2010 40
  73. What is the truth? Although the undocumented population has grown by an estimated 1,400 people per day, the murder rate declined from 61 per day in 1996 to 47 per day in 2006. Total murders per day have declined while the number of undocumented aliens entering the country has increased.Source: Paul Stiles, Novice Bear, January 10, 2008 41
  74. Arizona Adult Arrests 2002-2009 Non-Hispanic (Incl. White, Black, American Indian, Asian) Hispanic 350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: Arizona Department of Public Safety, “Crime in Arizona” Reports, 2002-2009 42
  75. Percentage that first-generation immigrants are less likely to commit any crimeSource: Sampson, Morenoff, et. al.: Public Health Matters, Vol. 95., No. 2, pp. 224-232 43
  76. 45% Percentage that first-generation immigrants are less likely to commit any crimeSource: Sampson, Morenoff, et. al.: Public Health Matters, Vol. 95., No. 2, pp. 224-232 43
  77. Incarceration rate of native-born males 18-39 in California with less than a high school diplomaSource: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008, p. 13 44
  78. 13% Incarceration rate of native-born males 18-39 in California with less than a high school diplomaSource: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008, p. 13 44
  79. Incarceration rate of immigrant males 18-40 in California with less than a high school diplomaSource: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008, p. 13 45
  80. 0.48% Incarceration rate of immigrant males 18-40 in California with less than a high school diplomaSource: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008, p. 13 45
  81. Times U.S. born men 18-40 are more likely than non-citizen Mexicans to be in CA jail or stateSource: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008 46
  82. 8 Times U.S. born men 18-40 are more likely than non-citizen Mexicans to be in CA jail or stateSource: Crime, Corrections and California, California Counts, PPIC, Vol. 9, No. 3, February, 2008 46
  83. Number of times native citizens are more likely to be incarcerated than any immigrantSource: Debunking the Myth of Immigrant Criminality: Imprisonment Among First- and Second-GenerationYoung Men, Rubén G. Rumbaut, Roberto G. Gonzales, Golnaz Komaie, and Charlie V. Morgan, 2006 47
  84. 5 Number of times native citizens are more likely to be incarcerated than any immigrantSource: Debunking the Myth of Immigrant Criminality: Imprisonment Among First- and Second-GenerationYoung Men, Rubén G. Rumbaut, Roberto G. Gonzales, Golnaz Komaie, and Charlie V. Morgan, 2006 47
  85. The percentage of the U.S. prison population who are U.S. citizensSource: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, March 24, 2012 48
  86. 73.3% The percentage of the U.S. prison population who are U.S. citizensSource: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, March 24, 2012 48
  87. Percentage of the U.S. prison population who are Mexican citizensSource: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, March 24, 2012 49
  88. 18.4% Percentage of the U.S. prison population who are Mexican citizensSource: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, March 24, 2012 49
  89. Percentage of the U.S. prison population sentenced for immigration violationsSource: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, March 24, 2012 50
  90. 12.1% Percentage of the U.S. prison population sentenced for immigration violationsSource: U.S Bureau of Prisons, BOP Quick Facts, March 24, 2012 50
  91. Hispanics as a percentage of all persons arrested in Arizona in 2009Source: Arizona Department of Public Safety, “Crime in Arizona,” 2009 51
  92. 31.7% Hispanics as a percentage of all persons arrested in Arizona in 2009Source: Arizona Department of Public Safety, “Crime in Arizona,” 2009 51
  93. Hispanics as a percentage of all Arizona residents, 2010Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2010 Census Results 52
  94. 29.6% Hispanics as a percentage of all Arizona residents, 2010Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2010 Census Results 52
  95. Crime Fallacies Unauthorized Claim Reality Difference% in Federal Prison 35% 17.5% +200%Prison Population 33% 13.8% +240% Violent Crime 18.6% -15.2% +122% Drop 3X US Avg. Hate Crime Not a problem +26% +2,600% Increase ‘07-’09 Identity Theft, 100% 2.2% -97.8% Fraud & Forgery 53
  96. “Crime” Fallacy Domestic Prisoners Criminal Aliens 100% 495 inmate decrease 90% equals 80% 1.2% of total AZ Prison Population 70% prisoners 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Jan 09 Mar 09 May 09 Jul 09 Sep 09 Nov 09 Jan 10 Mar 10 May 10 Jul 10 Sep 10 Nov 10 Jan 11 Mar 11 May 11 Jul 11 Sep 11 Nov 11 Jan 12 Mar 12Source: Arizona Dept. Of Corrections CAGMay11.pdf 54
  97. “Crime” Fallacy U.S. Citizen Prisoners Criminal Aliens 100% 253 inmate decrease 90% equals 80% 1.5% of total AZ Prison Population 70% prisoners 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Jul 10 Aug 10 Sep 10 Oct 10 Nov 10 Dec 10 Jan 11 Feb 11 Mar 11 Apr 11 May 11 Jun 11 Jul 11 Aug 11 Sep 11 Oct 11 Nov 11 Dec 11 Jan 12 Feb 12 Mar 12Source: Arizona Dept. Of Corrections CAGJul10.pdf - CAGMar12.pdf 55
  98. Jobs 56
  99. Percent of undocumented Mexican immigrants who have not completed high-schoolSource: Pew Hispanic Center, Survey of Mexican Migrants, December 6, 2005, p. 36. 57
  100. 66% Percent of undocumented Mexican immigrants who have not completed high-schoolSource: Pew Hispanic Center, Survey of Mexican Migrants, December 6, 2005, p. 36. 57
  101. Average day-laborer weekly incomeSource: Day Labor in the Golden State, CEP, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2007 58
  102. $259 Average day-laborer weekly incomeSource: Day Labor in the Golden State, CEP, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2007 58
  103. Arizona minimum wage for 2010Source: The Industrial Commission of Arizona, Minimum Wage Standard, 2010. 59
  104. $7.25/hr Arizona minimum wage for 2010Source: The Industrial Commission of Arizona, Minimum Wage Standard, 2010. 59
  105. Arizona H-2A hourly Adverse Effect Wage Rate (AWER) for 2010Source: USDA 75 FR 6884, February 12, 2010 60
  106. $9.71/hr Arizona H-2A hourly Adverse Effect Wage Rate (AWER) for 2010Source: USDA 75 FR 6884, February 12, 2010 60
  107. Median annual income for family of four in 2005Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Median Income for 4-Person Families, by State, 2005 61
  108. $67,019 Median annual income for family of four in 2005Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Median Income for 4-Person Families, by State, 2005 61
  109. Median salary of H1-B visa beneficiaries, 2009Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 62
  110. $64,000 Median salary of H1-B visa beneficiaries, 2009Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 62
  111. Average family income of a migrant family of fourSource: Pew Hispanic Center, Unauthorized Migrants: Numbers and Characteristics, 2005 63
  112. $25,000 Average family income of a migrant family of fourSource: Pew Hispanic Center, Unauthorized Migrants: Numbers and Characteristics, 2005 63
  113. Number of new jobs created in U.S. between 1996 and 2000Source: Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. 64
  114. 14 million Number of new jobs created in U.S. between 1996 and 2000Source: Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. 64
  115. Total U.S. population growth between 1996 and 2000Source: Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. 65
  116. 12 million Total U.S. population growth between 1996 and 2000Source: Bean, Frank D., and Gillian Stevens, 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. 65
  117. Undocumented Impact on AZ Wages 0-8 Years 8-11 Years 12-20 YearsSource: Peri, Giovanni, “Immigration, Labor Market and Wages: The Economists’ Perspective,” slide 15. 66
  118. Undocumented Impact on AZ Wages 0-8 Years 8-11 Years 12-20 Years 40% 34% 30% 20% 10% 8% 0% -3% -10% 1990-2004Source: Peri, Giovanni, “Immigration, Labor Market and Wages: The Economists’ Perspective,” slide 15. 66
  119. Foreign-Born Labor Force: 2007 Native Foreign BornSource: U.S. Census Bureau, The Foreign-Born Labor Force in the United States: 2007, Figure 6. 67
  120. Foreign-Born Labor Force: 2007 Native Foreign Born 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Management Services Sales & Office Production Construction AgricultureSource: U.S. Census Bureau, The Foreign-Born Labor Force in the United States: 2007, Figure 6. 67
  121. Foreign-Born Labor Force: 2007 Native Foreign Born 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Management Services Sales & Office Production Construction AgricultureSource: U.S. Census Bureau, The Foreign-Born Labor Force in the United States: 2007, Figure 6. 67
  122. Occupation on First Trip (Mexican) 0% 0.3% 0.4% 0.4% 100% 4% 6.3% 13% 26.6% 5.9% 90% 6.3% 80% 28.2% 33.7% 70% 0% Professional Skilled 60% Services Unskilled 50% 87.4% 89.7% 40% 62.4% 30% 58.4% 20% 10% 0% 1900-1941 1942-1965 1966-1986 1987-PresentSource: Mexican Migration Project, MMP128 - PERS File 68
  123. Annual Immigration Limits: 1996, 2004-2009 Family Preference Employment Preference 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 1996 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011Source: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, U.S. Legal Permanent Residents: 1996, 2004-2009 69
  124. Number of hours to fill quota of 65,000 H1-B visas for 2008Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 70
  125. 24 Number of hours to fill quota of 65,000 H1-B visas for 2008Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 70
  126. Days needed to fill quota of 66,000 H2-B visas for 2008Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 71
  127. 60 Days needed to fill quota of 66,000 H2-B visas for 2008Source: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 71
  128. Number of field workers needed in Yuma to bring in a winter lettuce cropSource: Interview on Desert Politics, Dec. 8, 2007 72
  129. 30,000 Number of field workers needed in Yuma to bring in a winter lettuce cropSource: Interview on Desert Politics, Dec. 8, 2007 72
  130. Number of new non-family related employment visas issued to Mexican citizens for all of 2009Source: U.S. Department of State, Report of the Visa Office 2009, Table III 73
  131. 375 Number of new non-family related employment visas issued to Mexican citizens for all of 2009Source: U.S. Department of State, Report of the Visa Office 2009, Table III 73
  132. Number of Mexicans still waiting for their green-card applications to be accepted or rejected in 2010Source: http://www.travel.state.gov/pdf/WaitingListItem.pdf 74
  133. 1,381,896 Number of Mexicans still waiting for their green-card applications to be accepted or rejected in 2010Source: http://www.travel.state.gov/pdf/WaitingListItem.pdf 74
  134. Number of green cards annually available worldwide for low-wage workers to immigrate permanentlySource: Section 203(e) of the Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act, as amended by Section1(e) of Pub. L. 105-139. 75
  135. 5,000 Number of green cards annually available worldwide for low-wage workers to immigrate permanentlySource: Section 203(e) of the Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act, as amended by Section1(e) of Pub. L. 105-139. 75
  136. Agricultural job demand following GA’s passing HB87 in June, 2011Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution 76
  137. 11,000 Agricultural job demand following GA’s passing HB87 in June, 2011Source: Atlanta Journal Constitution 76
  138. Number of probationers ordered by GA Governor Deal to harvest crops who actually showed upSource: Atlanta Journal Constitution 77
  139. 14 Number of probationers ordered by GA Governor Deal to harvest crops who actually showed upSource: Atlanta Journal Constitution 77
  140. Number of Georgia probationers who remained in the fields after one week on the jobSource: Atlanta Journal Constitution 78
  141. 2 Number of Georgia probationers who remained in the fields after one week on the jobSource: Atlanta Journal Constitution 78
  142. Taxes 79
  143. Undocumented immigrant’s net financial benefit to the Arizona economySource: University of Arizona, Immigrants in Arizona, Gans, 2006 80
  144. $940M Undocumented immigrant’s net financial benefit to the Arizona economySource: University of Arizona, Immigrants in Arizona, Gans, 2006 80
  145. Undocumented immigrant’s sales tax contributions to the Arizona economySource: University of Arizona, Immigrants in Arizona, Gans, 2006 81
  146. $78M Undocumented immigrant’s sales tax contributions to the Arizona economySource: University of Arizona, Immigrants in Arizona, Gans, 2006 81
  147. Earnings Suspense File account balance from non-matching SSNs as of the end of FY2009Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, SSA’S FY 2009 Performance and Accountability Report 82
  148. $836B Earnings Suspense File account balance from non-matching SSNs as of the end of FY2009Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, SSA’S FY 2009 Performance and Accountability Report 82
  149. Percent growth in SSA Earnings Suspense File account balance 2005-2009Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, SSA’S FY 2009 Performance and Accountability Report 83
  150. 60% Percent growth in SSA Earnings Suspense File account balance 2005-2009Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, SSA’S FY 2009 Performance and Accountability Report 83
  151. Amount of Suspense Fund balance payable to undocumented immigrantsSource: U.S. Social Security Administration, Auditor’s Report, 2007 84
  152. $0 Amount of Suspense Fund balance payable to undocumented immigrantsSource: U.S. Social Security Administration, Auditor’s Report, 2007 84
  153. Loss in Arizona state revenues from the loss of 50,000 immigrantsSource: APS Immigration Loss Impact Study 85
  154. $1B Loss in Arizona state revenues from the loss of 50,000 immigrantsSource: APS Immigration Loss Impact Study 85
  155. Annual estimated economic impact on Arizona’s economy from loss of 450,000 immigrantsSource: “Rising Tide or Shrinking Pie,” Dr. Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, Marshall Fitz, March 2011 86
  156. $48.8B Annual estimated economic impact on Arizona’s economy from loss of 450,000 immigrantsSource: “Rising Tide or Shrinking Pie,” Dr. Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, Marshall Fitz, March 2011 86
  157. Number of jurisdictions realizing any economic or social benefit promised by proponents of anti-immigration legislationSource: “A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis of the Impact of the Oklahoma Taxpayer andCitizen Protection Act of 2007,” Economic Impact Group, LLC, 2008 87
  158. Zero Number of jurisdictions realizing any economic or social benefit promised by proponents of anti-immigration legislationSource: “A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis of the Impact of the Oklahoma Taxpayer andCitizen Protection Act of 2007,” Economic Impact Group, LLC, 2008 87
  159. Assimilation & Integration 88
  160. The year in which the percentage of foreign-born residents reached its peak of 14.7%Source: Pew Hispanic Center, 2007 and Gibbons and Lennon, 1999 89
  161. 1910 The year in which the percentage of foreign-born residents reached its peak of 14.7%Source: Pew Hispanic Center, 2007 and Gibbons and Lennon, 1999 89
  162. Percentage of foreign-born residents of the U.S. in 2008Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey 90
  163. 12.5% Percentage of foreign-born residents of the U.S. in 2008Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey 90
  164. Annual rate of immigrants per 1,000 U.S. residents in 1910Source: The New Americans, National Research Council 91
  165. 13 Annual rate of immigrants per 1,000 U.S. residents in 1910Source: The New Americans, National Research Council 91
  166. Annual rate of immigrants per 1,000 U.S. residents in 2005Source: The New Americans, National Research Council 92
  167. 3 Annual rate of immigrants per 1,000 U.S. residents in 2005Source: The New Americans, National Research Council 92
  168. Percentage of the immigrant population that could not speak English at all in 1900Source: George Rodriguez, “ From Newcomers to New Americans...,” p. 18 93
  169. 25% Percentage of the immigrant population that could not speak English at all in 1900Source: George Rodriguez, “ From Newcomers to New Americans...,” p. 18 93
  170. Percentage of the immigrant population that could not speak English at all in 1990Source: George Rodriguez, “ From Newcomers to New Americans...,” p. 18 94
  171. 8% Percentage of the immigrant population that could not speak English at all in 1990Source: George Rodriguez, “ From Newcomers to New Americans...,” p. 18 94
  172. Percentage of Mexican-Americans who could speak English well in 1990Source: R. Alba and V. Nee, “Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration” p. 227 95
  173. 95% Percentage of Mexican-Americans who could speak English well in 1990Source: R. Alba and V. Nee, “Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration” p. 227 95
  174. Number of U.S. citizens who speak a non-English language at home 1980-2000Source: Bean FD, Stevens G. 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. New York: Russell Sage. P. 149 96
  175. 47 million Number of U.S. citizens who speak a non-English language at home 1980-2000Source: Bean FD, Stevens G. 2003. America’s Newcomers and the Dynamics of Diversity. New York: Russell Sage. P. 149 96
  176. Total number of new naturalized citizens in 2010Source: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, Naturalizations in the U.S., 2010 97
  177. 619,913 Total number of new naturalized citizens in 2010Source: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, Naturalizations in the U.S., 2010 97
  178. The rate at which Mexican immigrants become legal U.S. citizens compared to other countriesSource: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, Naturalizations in the U.S., 2009 98
  179. 2X The rate at which Mexican immigrants become legal U.S. citizens compared to other countriesSource: DHS, Office of Immigration Statistics, Naturalizations in the U.S., 2009 98
  180. Number of years after arrival that 75% of immigrants speak English as well as nativesSource: American Immigration Lawyers Association, Myths vs, Facts 99
  181. 10 Number of years after arrival that 75% of immigrants speak English as well as nativesSource: American Immigration Lawyers Association, Myths vs, Facts 99
  182. Learning the language First Generation Second Generation Third GenerationSource: Pew Hispanic Center, “English Usage Among Hispanics in the United States,” November 29, 2007,and Migration Policy Institute, “Bilingualism Persists, But English Still Dominates,” February, 2005. 100
  183. Learning the language First Generation Second Generation Third Generation 100% 75% 50% 25% 0% Pew MPISource: Pew Hispanic Center, “English Usage Among Hispanics in the United States,” November 29, 2007,and Migration Policy Institute, “Bilingualism Persists, But English Still Dominates,” February, 2005. 100
  184. Learning the language First Generation Second Generation Third Generation 100% 75% 50% 23% 25% 19% 0% Pew MPISource: Pew Hispanic Center, “English Usage Among Hispanics in the United States,” November 29, 2007,and Migration Policy Institute, “Bilingualism Persists, But English Still Dominates,” February, 2005. 100
  185. Learning the language First Generation Second Generation Third Generation 100% 92% 88% 75% 50% 23% 25% 19% 0% Pew MPISource: Pew Hispanic Center, “English Usage Among Hispanics in the United States,” November 29, 2007,and Migration Policy Institute, “Bilingualism Persists, But English Still Dominates,” February, 2005. 100
  186. Learning the language First Generation Second Generation Third Generation 100% 97% 94% 92% 88% 75% 50% 23% 25% 19% 0% Pew MPISource: Pew Hispanic Center, “English Usage Among Hispanics in the United States,” November 29, 2007,and Migration Policy Institute, “Bilingualism Persists, But English Still Dominates,” February, 2005. 100
  187. Number of years the unavailability of English language programs delays assimilationSource: Pew Hispanic Center 101
  188. 30 Number of years the unavailability of English language programs delays assimilationSource: Pew Hispanic Center 101
  189. Percent of the recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor in U.S. wars who were immigrantsSource: AILF Policy Report, March 2003 102
  190. 20% Percent of the recipients of the Congressional Medal of Honor in U.S. wars who were immigrantsSource: AILF Policy Report, March 2003 102
  191. Percentage of first-generation California immigrants (1970’s) who have purchased homes by 2000Source: Russell Sage Foundation 103
  192. 51% Percentage of first-generation California immigrants (1970’s) who have purchased homes by 2000Source: Russell Sage Foundation 103
  193. Percentage of California Hispanics who own their own homes, 2008Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Demographic Profile of Hispanics in California, 2008 104
  194. 46% Percentage of California Hispanics who own their own homes, 2008Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Demographic Profile of Hispanics in California, 2008 104
  195. Percentage of Arizona Hispanics who own their own homes, 2008Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Demographic Profile of Hispanics in Arizona, 2008 105
  196. 57% Percentage of Arizona Hispanics who own their own homes, 2008Source: Pew Hispanic Center, Demographic Profile of Hispanics in Arizona, 2008 105
  197. Percentage of all immigrants who have legal permanent resident statusSource: Dept. of Homeland Security 106
  198. 75% Percentage of all immigrants who have legal permanent resident statusSource: Dept. of Homeland Security 106
  199. Social & Health Services 107
  200. Percentage of any kind or any status of immigrant who receives food stampsSource: Federalist Society Seminar Immigration, Amnesty and the Rule of Law, Nov. 16, 2007 108
  201. 3% Percentage of any kind or any status of immigrant who receives food stampsSource: Federalist Society Seminar Immigration, Amnesty and the Rule of Law, Nov. 16, 2007 108
  202. Years legal permanent residents must pay into Social Security and Medicare before they get benefitsSource: Congressional Research Service 109
  203. 10 Years legal permanent residents must pay into Social Security and Medicare before they get benefitsSource: Congressional Research Service 109
  204. Percentage of California’s uncompensated health care in 2007 attributable to undocumented immigrant’s E.R. useSource: California Hospital Association 110
  205. 10% Percentage of California’s uncompensated health care in 2007 attributable to undocumented immigrant’s E.R. useSource: California Hospital Association 110
  206. National percentage of “Hispanic or Latino” total E.R. visits in 2006Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2006 Emergency Department Summary, Table 2: Number, percent distribution, andannual rate of emergency department visits with corresponding standard errors, by patient characteristics: United States, 2006 111
  207. 13% National percentage of “Hispanic or Latino” total E.R. visits in 2006Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2006 Emergency Department Summary, Table 2: Number, percent distribution, andannual rate of emergency department visits with corresponding standard errors, by patient characteristics: United States, 2006 111
  208. “White non-Hispanic” percentage of total Arizona E.R. visits in 2008Source: ADHS Table 4C-2 “Rates* of Emergency Room Visits by Race/Ethnicity and Gender, Arizona, 2008 112
  209. 61% “White non-Hispanic” percentage of total Arizona E.R. visits in 2008Source: ADHS Table 4C-2 “Rates* of Emergency Room Visits by Race/Ethnicity and Gender, Arizona, 2008 112
  210. “Hispanic or Latino” percentage of total Arizona E.R. visits in 2008Source: ADHS Table 4C-2 “Rates* of Emergency Room Visits by Race/Ethnicity and Gender, Arizona, 2008 113
  211. 28% “Hispanic or Latino” percentage of total Arizona E.R. visits in 2008Source: ADHS Table 4C-2 “Rates* of Emergency Room Visits by Race/Ethnicity and Gender, Arizona, 2008 113
  212. Percent undocumented immigrants are less likely to use emergency rooms than native LatinosSource: Sampson, Morenoff, et. al.: Public Health Matters, Vol. 95., No. 2 114
  213. 50% Percent undocumented immigrants are less likely to use emergency rooms than native LatinosSource: Sampson, Morenoff, et. al.: Public Health Matters, Vol. 95., No. 2 114
  214. The number of fewer doctor visits of undocumented Latinos compared with their US-born counterpartsSource: Alexander N. Ortega, PhD, et.al; Archives of Internal Medicine. 2007;167(21): 2354-2360 115
  215. 2.1 The number of fewer doctor visits of undocumented Latinos compared with their US-born counterpartsSource: Alexander N. Ortega, PhD, et.al; Archives of Internal Medicine. 2007;167(21): 2354-2360 115
  216. Recent immigrants per-person unadjusted medical expenditures compared to U.S. born, even when immigrants had full insuranceSource: Alexander N. Ortega, PhD, et.al; Archives of Internal Medicine. 2007;167(21): 2354-2360 116
  217. 1/2 - 2/3 Recent immigrants per-person unadjusted medical expenditures compared to U.S. born, even when immigrants had full insuranceSource: Alexander N. Ortega, PhD, et.al; Archives of Internal Medicine. 2007;167(21): 2354-2360 116
  218. Estimated taxes per-person spent annually on health care for undocumented immigrants aged 18-64Source: “Immigrants And The Cost Of Medical Care: Health Affairs, 25, no. 6 (2006): 1700-1711 117
  219. $11 Estimated taxes per-person spent annually on health care for undocumented immigrants aged 18-64Source: “Immigrants And The Cost Of Medical Care: Health Affairs, 25, no. 6 (2006): 1700-1711 117
  220. “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets youinto trouble. It’s what you know for sure thatjust ain’t so.” Mark Twain 118
  221. Other Facts 119
  222. Number of undocumented immigrants who registered to vote in Maricopa County 1991-PresentSource: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 120
  223. 0 Number of undocumented immigrants who registered to vote in Maricopa County 1991-PresentSource: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 120
  224. Level of crime for any non-citizen to attempt to register to voteSource: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 121
  225. Felony Level of crime for any non-citizen to attempt to register to voteSource: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 121
  226. A green-card holder’s chances of becoming a U.S. citizen after attempting to register to voteSource: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 122
  227. None A green-card holder’s chances of becoming a U.S. citizen after attempting to register to voteSource: Desert Politics Interview with Maricopa County Director of Elections, Karen Osborne, 11/3/07 122
  228. Number of states legislatures where SB 1070 copycat laws were introduced in 2011Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 123
  229. 25 Number of states legislatures where SB 1070 copycat laws were introduced in 2011Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 123
  230. Number of states where SB 1070 copycats passed into law in 2011Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 124
  231. 4 Number of states where SB 1070 copycats passed into law in 2011Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 124
  232. Failure rate of state SB 1070 copycat laws in 2011Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 125
  233. 84% Failure rate of state SB 1070 copycat laws in 2011Source: National Council of State Legislators, http://www.ncsl.org/default.aspx?tabid=19897 125
  234. Economic Impact Fallacies Unauthorized Claim Reality Difference% of AZ Population 10% 7% +30% Education Costs $810M $379M +214% Health Costs $400M $24M +1,600% Tax Payments $257M $2.84B -1,100% 126
  235. Economics of Population Loss Immigrant Pop. Gross State Tax Revenue Income Loss Job Loss Decline Product Loss Loss 15% $8.3B $5.3B 99,000 $636M 30% $14.4B $9.4B 172,000 $1.27B 50% $20B $15.7B 291,000 $2.11B 100% $48.8B $29.5B 581,000 $4.22BSource: "A Rising Tide or a Shrinking Pie," M. Fitz and R. Hinojosa, Immigration Policy Council, March, 2011. 127
  236. Arizona Poll Results 128
  237. Disagree with classifying undocumented immigrants as “common criminals”Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 129
  238. 65% Disagree with classifying undocumented immigrants as “common criminals”Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 129
  239. Agree that politicians are turning immigration into an “ugly racial issue”Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 130
  240. 66% Agree that politicians are turning immigration into an “ugly racial issue”Source: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 130
  241. Agree that a “guest worker” program should be implementedSource: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 131
  242. 78% Agree that a “guest worker” program should be implementedSource: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 131
  243. Agree that fair and humane treatment of foreign workers is as important as securing the borderSource: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 132
  244. 83% Agree that fair and humane treatment of foreign workers is as important as securing the borderSource: BRC Rocky Mountain Poll - RMP 2007-V-01 132
  245. “The greatest threat to democracy is having apublic that thinks it is fully informed, but reallyisn’t very well informed at all.” Linda Foley 133
  246. Thank You How You Can Help Schedule a presentation in your community Get involved and help educate the public Learn more at: www.azeir.org © 2008-2011 Arizona Employers for Immigration Reform 134

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