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An introduction to urban design

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A brief overview of the urban design discipline contrasting theory with practice.

Published in: Design
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An introduction to urban design

  1. 1. An Introduction to Urban Design 22 March 2016 Colin Hattingh
  2. 2. SOUTH AFRICA
  3. 3. THEORY PRACTICE
  4. 4. Differing roles & focus
  5. 5. WHAT IS URBAN DESIGN ?
  6. 6. “…for all our investment in the complexity of individual buildings on the one hand & in elaborate engineering infrastructures on the other, we have failed to achieve a humane and coherent physical setting for human life” Gosling & Maitland: Concepts of Urban Design, 1984
  7. 7. Urban design is concerned with the design of the buildings, places, spaces and networks that make up our towns and cities, and the ways people use them. It ranges in scale from a metropolitan region, city or town down to a street, public space or even a single building. Urban design is concerned not just with appearances and built form but with the environmental, economic, social and cultural consequences of design. It is an approach that draws together many different sectors and professions, and it includes both the process of decision-making as well as the outcomes of design.
  8. 8. creating memorable places... THE ART OF DESIGNING THE PUBLIC ENVIRONMENT OF A CITY, INCLUDING THE INTERFACE BETWEEN PRIVATE PROPERTIES AND THE PUBLIC ENVIRONMENT
  9. 9. CITY DESIGN
  10. 10. CIVIC DESIGN
  11. 11. PALEY PARK
  12. 12. BRYANT PARK
  13. 13. FEDERATION SQUARE
  14. 14. FUNCTIONALITY FIT MEANINGFULNESS VARIETY INTEGRATION CHOICE CUSTODIANSHIP LIVEABLE COORDINATION CHOICE CUSTODIANSHIPVIBRANT
  15. 15. Context: seeing buildings, places and spaces as part of whole towns and cities Character: reflecting and enhancing the distinctive character, heritage and identity of our urban environment
  16. 16. Connections: enhancing how different networks link together for people Choice: ensuring diversity and choice for people
  17. 17. Creativity: encouraging innovative and imaginative solutions Custodianship: ensuring design is environmentally sustainable, safe and healthy
  18. 18. Collaboration: communicating and sharing knowledge across sectors, professions and with communities.
  19. 19. VISTA outlines Hamilton’s expectations for better designed environments. The guide highlights key urban design principles considered fundamental to Hamilton’s development as a dynamic, prosperous, memorable and sustainable city.
  20. 20. METROPOLIS CITY PLANNING REGION DISTRICT PRECINCT SITE BUILDING
  21. 21. Physical aspects Metaphysical aspects
  22. 22. What is your favourite place and why?
  23. 23. Physical Characteristics (buildings, roads, trees, shade, water, landmarks, pedestrians, vistas, facilities, ridges, proportion, arcades, sunlight, colour, scale, space…) Metaphysical Characteristics Metaphysics investigates principles of reality transcending those of any particular science. Concerned with explaining the fundamental nature of being and the world – “Intangibles”. (safety, character, cosmopolitan, vibrant, clean, legible, atmosphere, memorable, welcoming, interesting, sense of place, sterile…)
  24. 24. UD IS NOT…. URBAN COSMETICS
  25. 25. IS NOT ABOUT PAVING PATTERNS STREET FURNITURE TREES
  26. 26. Why?
  27. 27. “DESIGN DISJUNCTURE: SCENIC SPLENDOUR MEETS URBAN MEDIOCRITY”
  28. 28. PDP
  29. 29. Second Generation Plan Introduction of urban design Objectives and Policies to ensure that the Plan reflects and aligns with the commitments that Council has made to improve urban design outcomes through RMA processes.
  30. 30. From ‘rules-dominated’ design response  Outcome focussed ‘design-with-rules’ Change in Approach
  31. 31. RD Status in the Plan Central City rules and standards set a baseline expectation: • Rules & Standards guide applicants as to what is acceptable • A breach of rules would lead to an RD assessment on that matter which has been failed • Guided by: – Objectives & Polices – Relevant assessment criteria – Relevant Design guidance • If its good enough, rules can be broken
  32. 32. Why RD? • Have the ability to enter a dialogue with the applicant and could advise the applicant that the building proposed does not result in an acceptable outcome in relation to the objectives and policies and has not adequately considered the matters of discretion. • Discussion would use Rules and Standards as a starting point and benchmark of what is expected.
  33. 33. • PDP has a range of criteria to be used in assessing resource consents • Particular Interest –B Design and Layout (36) –C Character and Amenity (28) Assessment Criteria
  34. 34. B23 (Central City Zone) “Whether the design of the external façade relates to and compliments the surrounding architectural form, and breaks down the scale of the building so as not to create a large featureless building façade”
  35. 35. B 35 (Residential Activities) “The extent to which the design of residential development will provide visual interest and passive surveillance of public spaces and streets”.
  36. 36. CityGate Centre Place CONCEPT – INTERSECTION UPGRADE Ward and Anglesea Streets The Warehouse Colour paving to pedestrian crossing New trees and benches New trees & benches Left turn lane removed Planted median Existing trees Not to scale Dick Smith New trees Stairs to plaza
  37. 37. • Consider row or terrace building typology • Units oriented parallel to street • Designed to overlook street and provide street address • Improved CPTED outcomes • Provide rear access lane • Higher intensity away from neighbours • Define public/private interface • Celebrate corner • Provide on site amenity – improved access to sunlight, outlook • Reduce hard surfacing increase landscaping • Visually interesting, unique contemporary designs
  38. 38. DOES IT MATTER? TO CONCLUDE…
  39. 39. City of Arts and Sciences by Santiago Calatrava, Valencia Milwaukee Art Museum
  40. 40. Centre Pompidou Modern Art Museum, Paris Denver Art Museum Frederic C. Hamilton Building by Daniel Libeskind

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