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Kanban : optimising for predictability

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How to turn small tasks into a predictable flow of deliverables and use lean principles to experiment, measure and learn in the process.

Published in: Technology, Business
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Kanban : optimising for predictability

  1. 1. KANBAN Optimising for predictability
  2. 2. Topics  Principles & Definitions  Visualising workflow  Limiting work in progress (WIP)  Measuring & Reporting  Continuous improvement  Benefits to Kanban  Q&A (if I can)
  3. 3. Topics  Principles & Definitions  Visualising workflow  Limiting work in progress (WIP)  Measuring & Reporting  Continuous improvement  Benefits to Kanban  Q&A (if I can) LEAN
  4. 4. Principles & Definitions “A methodology for managing the flow of work to allow for evolutionary change”  Is based on visualisation  Follows a pull not push principle  Believes in constraining the process to improve predictability and quality  Has continuous improvement at its core
  5. 5. Visualising workflow
  6. 6. Visualising workflow The board
  7. 7. Visualising workflow A set of columns that are defined by the team
  8. 8. Visualising workflow They are activities and not job roles
  9. 9. Visualising workflow Work in progress
  10. 10. Visualising workflow Work done (in the buffer)
  11. 11. Visualising workflow Lead time
  12. 12. Visualising workflow
  13. 13. Visualising workflow Cycle time
  14. 14. Visualising workflow
  15. 15. Visualising workflow “Houston we have a problem!”
  16. 16. Visualising workflow WIP limits / constraints
  17. 17. Limiting WIP  Following a lean principle Kanban limits the work in progress to encourage a JIT delivery of features from one stage to the next
  18. 18. Limiting WIP  Limits can be controversial in is almost certainly why Kanban adoption fails.  Some calculations can be done as a starting point for how teams should set their limits – DEVELOPMENT = ½ of development resources • This encourages paired programming, better training and knowledge share amongst the team and ultimately better quality code – ANALYSIS/ELABORATION = ½ of development limit – TESTING = 2/3 of development limit – DEPLOYMENT = 1
  19. 19. Limiting WIP  Limits can be controversial in is almost certainly why Kanban adoption fails.  Some calculations can be done as a starting point for how teams should set their limits – DEVELOPMENT = ½ of development resources • This encourages paired programming, better training and knowledge share amongst the Agencies = team and ultimately better quality code – ANALYSIS/ELABORATION = ½ of development limit – TESTING = 2/3 of development limit – DEPLOYMENT = 1 3 stories for every 4 devs.
  20. 20. Limiting WIP: Example
  21. 21. Limiting WIP: Example Bottleneck
  22. 22. Limiting WIP: Example BA or Dev resource could help to test to clear this bottleneck
  23. 23. Limiting WIP: Example Pull = Flow
  24. 24. Measuring & Reporting  We use Cumulative Flow Diagrams to assess: – Bottlenecks – Lead time – Cycle time  From these we can determine where we need to address issues in quality, invest in training or add additional resources to the team  Reporting is done daily so we start seeing feedback very quickly
  25. 25. Measuring & Reporting
  26. 26. Continuous Improvement  Continuous improvement is about polishing with tiny changes. It is not about drastic changes to processes and systems.  It can be project specific in terms of tools or resources.  It could be more generic, such as knowledge sharing and fostering a culture of collaboration.  The following are the things that I believe can make the biggest impact…
  27. 27. Continuous Improvement: CI  Get as close to one click deployments as you can  Train a DevOps team to be responsible for regular deployments  Consider innovative approached to infrastructure making it easy to setup and teardown environments  Invest in automated testing at both unit and functional levels that can be executed at deployment  Focus on zero downtime deployments
  28. 28. Continuous Improvement: T-shaped People  Its important to embrace that we can all do more than our job title – – – – As a BA I can do some testing. I could even do a little bit of HTML!! Our designers can do HTML Our HTML people can do some designing Our developers could test each others code
  29. 29. Continuous Improvement: T-shaped People  Its important to embrace that we can all do more than our job title – – – – As a BA I can do some testing. I could even do a little bit of HTML!! Our designers can do HTML Our HTML people can do some designing Our developers could test each others code All of you could do my job, it’s easy ;-)
  30. 30. Benefits to Kanban  The output of deliverables becomes predictable – Which means forecasting becomes predictable – In theory the process also becomes scalable to increase predictable outputs  It breaks down walls and encourages ‘team delivery’ – Everyone is focused in shipping features, not just the guy at the end of the process  It encourages greater collaboration and innovation – Teams focus on finding leaner ways of doing things that take less time or cost less
  31. 31. Q&A If we have time...

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