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5.4 Shared Resource:
3.4 Microfranchise.
Model Behavior
20 Business Model Innovations
for Sustainability
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20 Business Model Innovations for Sustainability

  1. 1. 5.4 Shared Resource: 3.4 Microfranchise. Model Behavior 20 Business Model Innovations for Sustainability This infographic is an extract from the report, Model Behavior: 20 Business Model Innovations for Sustainability Download the full report at: www. sustainability.com/model-behavior Environmental Impact 1.1. Closed Loop Production: 1.4. Rematerialization: 2.2 Cooperative Ownership: BUY 1.2. Physical to Virtual: Closed-Loop Production: The material used to create a product is continually recycled through the production system. 2.2 Cooperative Ownership: BUY 1.2. Physical to Virtual: Physical to Virtual: Replacing brick and mortar infrastructure with virtual services. 1.1. Closed Loop Production: 1.4. Rematerialization: 2.2 Cooperative Ownership: 1.2. Physical to Virtual: Rematerialization: Developing innovative ways to source materials from recovered waste, creating entirely new products. Cooperative Ownership: Companies owned and managed by members, often taking broader stakeholder concerns into account, including those of employees, customers, suppliers, the local community and in some cases, the environment. 1.1. Closed Loop Production: 1.4. Rematerialization: 2.2 Cooperative Ownership: BUY 1.2. Physical to Virtual: Crowdfunding: Enabling an entrepreneur to tap the resources of his/her network to raise money in increments from a group of people. 3.2 Differential Pricing: 3.1 Crowdfunding PRO $$ $ $ $ $ $$$ Freemium: Offering a proprietary product or service free of charge, but charging a premium for advanced features, functionality or virtual goods. 3.2 Differential Pricing: 3.1 Crowdfunding 4.2 Microfinance: 3.3 Freemium: PREMIUM $$ BUY BASIC FREE PRO $$$ BUY $$ $ $ $ $ $$$ Differential Pricing: Realizing customers may benefit from the same product but have different payment thresholds, companies charge more to those who can afford it in order to subsidize those who cannot. 3.2 Differential Pricing: 3.1 Crowdfunding 4.2 Microfinance: 3.3 Freemium: PREMIUM $$ BUY BASIC FREE PRO $$$ BUY $$ $ $ $ $ $$$ Microfinance: Providing small loans—and in some cases access to financial services—to low-income borrowers who do not have access to a traditional bank account. 3.2 Differential Pricing: 3.1 Crowdfunding 4.2 Microfinance: 3.3 Freemium: PREMIUM $$ BUY BASIC FREE PRO $$$ BUY $ $ $ $ $$$ Micro-Franchise: Leveraging the basic concepts of traditional franchising, but specifically focusing on creating opportunities for the poor to own and manage their own businesses. Behavior Change: Using a business model to stimulate behavior change to reduce consumption, change purchasing patterns or modify daily habits. 5.2 Behavior Change: 3.4 Microfranchise. Shared Resource: Enabling customers to access a product, rather than own it, and use it only as needed; often dependent on the participation and generosity of community members to share their goods with others. 5.4 Shared Resource: 3.4 Microfranchise. Base of the Pyramid Social Innovation Diverse Impact Financing Innovation Inclusive Sourcing: Retooling the supply chain to make a company more inclusive, focusing on supporting the farmer or producer providing the product, not just the volume of the product sourced. Buy One, Give One: Selling a specific good/service and using a portion of the profits to donate a similar good/service to those in need. Product as a Service: Consumers pay for the service a product provides without the responsibility of repairing, replacing or disposing of it. Building a Marketplace: Delivering social programs, adapting to local markets, and bundling with other services like microfinance and technical assistance enable companies to build new markets for their products. Produce on Demand: Producing a product only when consumer demand has been quantified and confirmed. Subscription Model: Customers pay a recurring fee, usually monthly or annually, to gain ongoing access to a product or service; model has been used to lower barriers to entry to the purchase of green innovations. Innovative Product Financing: Consumers lease or rent an item that they can’t afford or don’t want to buy outright. Pay for Success: Employing performance- based contracting, typically between providers of some form of social service and the government. Alternative Marketplace: When a company circumvents a traditional method of transaction or invents a new type of transaction to unleash untapped value.
  • MarioMelillo1

    Dec. 27, 2020
  • tamarahr

    Apr. 12, 2020
  • Sani_Starr

    Jan. 19, 2020

20 Business Model Innovations for Sustainability

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