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YM AIA ME 2016 Presentation

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Understand the expression of identity as part of socio-cultural sustainability
Identify the different types and levels of identity expressions
Discuss examples of projects incorporating socio-cultural identity in the design

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YM AIA ME 2016 Presentation

  1. 1. AIA Middle East 2016 AIA Middle East International Conference November 17, 2016 in Cairo, Egypt From Concept to Completion: How Architects & Urban Planners are shaping the Middle East Theme:: Architecture & Sustainability The Expression of Socio- Cultural Identity in ME Architecture Presenter: Dr. Yasser Mahgoub Adjunct Professor of Architecture, AUC
  2. 2. Learning Objectives • Understand the expression of identity as part of socio-cultural sustainability • Identify the different types and levels of identity expressions • Discuss examples of projects incorporating socio-cultural identity in the design
  3. 3. The Middle East ►The Middle East is a subcontinent with no clear boundaries, often used as a synonym to Near East, in opposition to Far East.
  4. 4. The Middle East ►The term "Middle East" was popularized around 1900 in the United Kingdom; it has a loose definition traditionally encompassing countries or regions in Western Asia and parts of North Africa.
  5. 5. Far EastMiddle EastNear East North Africa Europe Asia UK South East Asia India Africa North America South America
  6. 6. Middle East Architecture
  7. 7. Middle East Modern Architecture
  8. 8. Middle East Modern Architecture
  9. 9. The Middle East Geography
  10. 10. The Middle East History
  11. 11. The Middle East Traditional Architecture
  12. 12. The Middle East Contemporary
  13. 13. Architecture in the Middle East Mecca, Saudi Arabia
  14. 14. Architecture in the Middle East Beirut, Lebanon
  15. 15. Architecture in the Middle East Tehran, Iran
  16. 16. Architecture in the Middle East Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  17. 17. Architecture in the Middle East Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  18. 18. Architecture in the Middle East Cairo, Egypt
  19. 19. Architecture in the Middle East Dubai, UAE
  20. 20. Architecture in the Middle East Abu Dhabu, UAE
  21. 21. Architecture in the Middle East Kuwait
  22. 22. The Middle East Confllict Oil Straits Traffic Unrest
  23. 23. 35 Introduction • The phenomenon of expressing cultural identity in architecture is recognized in many parts of the world. • It started after the spread of the international style, during the second half of the 20th century, and intensified as a result of the spread of globalization as a dominating world view at the end of the century.
  24. 24. 36 Introduction • The phenomenon of expressing cultural identity in architecture is recognized in many parts of the world. • It started after the spread of the international style, during the second half of the 20th century, and intensified as a result of the spread of globalization as a dominating world view at the end of the century.
  25. 25. 37 Introduction • The phenomenon of expressing cultural identity in architecture is recognized in many parts of the world. • It started after the spread of the international style, during the second half of the 20th century, and intensified as a result of the spread of globalization as a dominating world view at the end of the century.
  26. 26. Manuel Castells Manuel Castells states that “the construction of identities is fundamental to the dynamic of societies” and that “cultural identity is the process by which social actors build their own meaning according to cultural attributes.” 38
  27. 27. Charles Correa Charles Correa defines identity as a process, and not a found object. “The search for identity is a by-product of looking at our real problems, rather than self-consciously trying to find identity as an end in itself.” 39
  28. 28. Identity Economic Political Social Urban Cultural Historical
  29. 29. ME Rapid Change
  30. 30. ME Rapid Change • The ME region has experienced rapid political, economic, physical and technological change during the second half of the 20th century.
  31. 31. Doha 2005 Doha 2007 Doha 2010 Doha Skyline Development Doha 1960
  32. 32. Socio-Cultural Change • These mega projects were based on 20th century planning and architectural design theories that focused mainly on modern and technological advances.
  33. 33. Super Projects • This change was introduced through super projects including urban master plans, infrastructure projects and individual buildings. Kuwait Doha
  34. 34. Neighborhood Extended Family Individual Houses
  35. 35. Key Aspects of Change • A mixture of expensive materials • A range of surface treatments in terms of environmental control, • Arbitrary expression of internal functions • Range of forms • Lack of cohesion. Kuwait Dubai Doha
  36. 36. From Alleys to Streets People Cars
  37. 37. From Alleys to Streets People Cars
  38. 38. From Vernacular to Modern
  39. 39. From Vernacular Houses to Modern Villas
  40. 40. From Vernacular Houses to Modern Villas Social Individual
  41. 41. From Traditional to Modern Interiors ModernTraditional
  42. 42. Modern vs Vernacular: Climatic Responses
  43. 43. Sustainability
  44. 44. Concerns 68 • 1960’s Vernacular • 1970’s Energy • 1980’s Environment • 1990’s Sustainable (Economic, Environment, Equity) • 2000’s Green • 2010’s Integrated Sustainability Systems (Smart Strategies) • 2015 Resilient (Change) 1960’s Vernacular 1970’s Energy 1980’s Environment 1990’s Sustainable 2000’s Green 2010 Integrated 2015 Resilience
  45. 45. Sustainability • Sustainability as 3Es: Economic, Environmental and Equity (Socio- cultural).
  46. 46. Sustainability • Most projects focus on economic and environmental sustainability.
  47. 47. Sustainability • They usually ignore socio- cultural sustainability due to lack of knowledge and strategies. • This is due to the difficulty to identify and design for specific people, society and culture.
  48. 48. Sustainable Building Design 72 Socio-Economic
  49. 49. Levels of Socio-Cultural Aspects
  50. 50. Levels of Socio-Cultural Aspects Identity is constructed from the person through family, society and culture. This understanding will help architects and planners design better environments that correspond to social and cultural needs. Identity Culture Society Family Personal LevelsofUnderstanding
  51. 51. Levels of Socio-Cultural Aspects • Several levels of understanding should be addressed to study and design for a specific society or culture: 1. Personal level includes the position of individual in society and culture, and privacy requirements based on gender and age. 2. Family level: includes immediate and extended family members and family members relationships and obligations. 3. Society level includes relationships between men, women, children, society, ethnicity, kinship, and nationality. 4. Cultural level includes history, language, religion, sacred and profane, traditions, customs, and costumes. 5. Identity level includes personal, social and cultural identity.
  52. 52. Socio-Cultural Change
  53. 53. Socio-Cultural Change • This transformation influenced many cultural aspects of societies through the introduction of the villa in place of the traditional courtyard houses.
  54. 54. Cultural Constants and Variables • The problem of current approaches to socio- cultural applications is that they view culture as constant relating it to the past only and not as a variable that relates to the present and the future.
  55. 55. Socio-Cultural Change • Change is an integral characteristic of culture, yet cultural change is slower than techno-physical change. “Culture is variable, designed environments respond to variable definitions of needs and priorities as expressed in varying schemata: environments are culture specific.” Rapaport CORE PERIPHERAL
  56. 56. The Middle East Contemporary Culture
  57. 57. The Middle East Contemporary Culture
  58. 58. The Middle East Contemporary Culture
  59. 59. The Middle East Contemporary Culture
  60. 60. The Middle East Contemporary Culture
  61. 61. The Middle East Contemporary Culture
  62. 62. Core Peripheral Built Environment Culture Contemporary Traditional Understanding Socio-Cultural Aspects
  63. 63. Public State/Official Governmental Technical Gulf Socio-cultural Arab Islamic Global Private Pragmatic MetaphoricCanonicIconic Analogic Symbolic Semi-Public Institutional Economic
  64. 64. Approach Identity Scale Economic Gulf Technical Arab Islamic Global Cultural Public State/Official Governmental Private Semi-Public Institutional Pragmatic MetaphoricCanonicIconic Analogic Symbolic
  65. 65. Design
  66. 66. Purpose and Function in Design • Design of built environments should address equally the socio-cultural and techno-physical aspects of spaces. • There is a deficiency in the flow of information during the design process that tends to ignore socio-cultural aspects in favor of techno-physical aspects.
  67. 67. Design Considerations Design Socio- Cultural Technical Formal Programmatic
  68. 68. Design Considerations • Design methods and process should address the three dimensions equally; the techno-physical, the visual-aesthetic, and the socio-cultural. Socio- cultural Techno- physical Visual- aesthetic
  69. 69. The Built Environment Interior Design Architecture Landscape Urban Design Urban Planning Architecture is not enough!
  70. 70. From Livable to Lovable Environments • This approach will achieve the goal of transforming Gulf cities from only Livable to also Lovable environments. From Livable To Lovable
  71. 71. Expressions
  72. 72. THANK YOU.

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