Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
prepared by/
Zakaria Fayez Youssef El-Khweskey
(Demonstrator at Hotel Studies Department )
1
The Role of Universities in
P...
Content
2
What is Entrepreneurship?
Entrepreneurship Education
Some Good Examples
Some Courses at Universities in Chin...
What is Entrepreneurship?
Strategic thinkingStrategic thinking and risk-taking behaviorrisk-taking behavior that results ...
What is Entrepreneurship?
(CON.(
The application of entrepreneurial skills within an existing,
corporate or public sector...
Entrepreneurship Education
5
Entrepreneurship education has not been a primary focus of
undergraduateundergraduate curric...
Entrepreneurship Education
(C0N.)
6
There is a significant correlation between entrepreneurship
coursescourses and econom...
Entrepreneurship Education
(C0N.(
7
 Entrepreneurship educationEntrepreneurship education has been formally recognized in...
Entrepreneurship Education
(C0N.(
8
Entrepreneurship education is becoming a major forceforce in all
over the world.
The...
Entrepreneurship Education
(CON.(
9
The importance of understanding the cultureculture and backgroundbackground of
a univ...
Entrepreneurship Education
(CON.)
10
The success of entrepreneurship education or educational
programs cannotcannot be ev...
Entrepreneurship Education
(CON.(
11
Hospitality educationHospitality education is a link Between the academicacademic an...
Some Good Examples
12
UK
 Finland: Entrepreneurship education in the national curriculum.
Spain: Secondary school stude...
Other Good Examples
13
the University of Cambridgethe University of Cambridge
• One example of entrepreneurship education ...
Some Courses at Universities in
China
14
Entrepreneurship Management
Financial Management
Business Plans
Leadership
C...
15
The Task of the Instructor
1. Teaching, Learning, Coaching and Assessment
Creating learning environments that encourage e...
The Task of the Instructor (CON.(
2. From Case Studies to Practical Situations
Educators enable students to shift from an...
The Task of the Instructor
(CON.(
4. From Traditional learning (Listening) to Active
learning (Discussions, workshops, Sem...
19
20
•Entrepreneurship education can be implemented in all types
of organizations, from public schools , colleges , universi...
Positive Outcomes for Students
21
Effective entrepreneurship education prepares people
to be responsibleresponsible, ente...
Positive Outcomes for Students
(CON.)
22
WealthWealth and a high majority of jobsjobs are created by small
businesses tha...
Positive Outcomes for Students
(CON.(
23
Helping students recognize opportunitiesopportunities to create and build
someth...
Positive Outcomes for Students
(CON.(
24
Increasing a sense of control over their own lives.
 Greater awareness of perso...
Positive Outcomes for Students
(CON.)
25
Enhancing awareness of career.
Expanding awareness of entrepreneurs contributio...
Positive Outcomes for Students
(CON.)
26
Applying principles of human relations management.
speaking the language of bus...
27
Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship
Education
Methods for Delivering
Entrepreneurship Education
28
1. Comprehensive Curriculum Delivery
2. Risk Management
Methods for Delivering
Entrepreneurship Education (CON.)
29
3. Basic Academic Skills
Using entrepreneurship to demonstrat...
Methods for Delivering
Entrepreneurship Education (CON.(
30
5. Business Planning
Students should be able to develop a com...
Methods for Delivering
Entrepreneurship Education (CON.)
31
7. Entrepreneurship as an Economic Force
8. Practical Learning...
Methods for Delivering
Entrepreneurship Education (CON.)
32
9. Problem-Based Learning
Students should learn how to be goo...
Methods for Delivering
Entrepreneurship Education (CON.)
33
11. People in the Community
Involving individuals from the su...
Methods for Delivering
Entrepreneurship Education(CON.)
34
13. Supporting Individuals
With the resources, training, guida...
35
36
1.Common mistakes about Entrepreneurs
2. Why Many Small Businesses Fail?
1.Common Mistakes about
Entrepreneurs
37
Entrepreneurs are born, not made.
Money is the successful key.
You have to be ...
2.Why Many Small Businesses
Fail?
38
Poor planning
Poor commitment
Poor Leadership
 Ethical Failure
Poor financial Co...
Future Recommendations
39
40
Entrepreneurship Education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Entrepreneurship Education

3,841 views

Published on

The Role of Universities in Promoting Entrepreneurship & Employability

  • My brother found Custom Writing Service ⇒ www.HelpWriting.net ⇐ and ordered a couple of works. Their customer service is outstanding, never left a query unanswered.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Very nice tips on this. In case you need help on any kind of academic writing visit website ⇒ www.WritePaper.info ⇐ and place your order
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • You can try to use this service HelpWriting.net I have used it several times in college and was absolutely satisfied with the result.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Entrepreneurship Education

  1. 1. prepared by/ Zakaria Fayez Youssef El-Khweskey (Demonstrator at Hotel Studies Department ) 1 The Role of Universities in Promoting Entrepreneurship Education and Employability
  2. 2. Content 2 What is Entrepreneurship? Entrepreneurship Education Some Good Examples Some Courses at Universities in China The Task of Instructors Outcomes from Encouraging Entrepreneurship Education Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education We Should Know!!!!! Future Recommendations
  3. 3. What is Entrepreneurship? Strategic thinkingStrategic thinking and risk-taking behaviorrisk-taking behavior that results in the creation of new opportunities for individuals and/or organizations. Entrepreneurship is the ability to create and buildbuild something from practically nothingnothing. Entrepreneurship education at the university level is important to build generationsbuild generations of leadersleaders for global innovation. Process through which entrepreneurs createcreate and growgrow firms. 3
  4. 4. What is Entrepreneurship? (CON.( The application of entrepreneurial skills within an existing, corporate or public sector organization is termed 'intrapreneurship'.'intrapreneurship'. Both entrepreneursentrepreneurs and intrapreneursintrapreneurs require enterprise skills and behaviors as well as business knowledge, behaviors' and skills that are specific to the particular context. 4
  5. 5. Entrepreneurship Education 5 Entrepreneurship education has not been a primary focus of undergraduateundergraduate curricula. Entrepreneurship education has become a focus in the strategic planning of curriculumcurriculum planning across programs. Entrepreneurship is the individual’s ability to translate ideasideas into actionsinto actions. It is provided and supported by many educational institutions and organizations.
  6. 6. Entrepreneurship Education (C0N.) 6 There is a significant correlation between entrepreneurship coursescourses and economiceconomic value creation. Recently, entrepreneurship education is a long-term strategica long-term strategic planplan that helps an universityuniversity to become famousfamous and to have a competitive advantagecompetitive advantage in the world. The economic strength of the U.S. resulted from entrepreneurship education.
  7. 7. Entrepreneurship Education (C0N.( 7  Entrepreneurship educationEntrepreneurship education has been formally recognized in universities since the 19401940 by the United Statesthe United States. In 19471947, over 1,6001,600 American colleges and universities offer courses and degrees in entrepreneurship education. In 19941994, 120,000120,000 American students were taking entrepreneurship courses.
  8. 8. Entrepreneurship Education (C0N.( 8 Entrepreneurship education is becoming a major forceforce in all over the world. The interest in entrepreneurship education at many levels is increasing within universities. In 20052005, small businesses made up over 99%over 99% of the overall businesses in the United States, European Union, and JapanUnited States, European Union, and Japan.
  9. 9. Entrepreneurship Education (CON.( 9 The importance of understanding the cultureculture and backgroundbackground of a university and specific departmentsdepartments within a universitya university is key to successfully incorporating entrepreneurial education into the curriculum. Since 20022002 the Chinese governmentChinese government has taken a leading role in promoting entrepreneurship education, hoping to cope creatively with the structural unemployment of universityunemployment of university graduatesgraduates resulting from mass higher education.
  10. 10. Entrepreneurship Education (CON.) 10 The success of entrepreneurship education or educational programs cannotcannot be evaluated by the number of graduatedthe number of graduated studentsstudents.. ButBut 1. The socio-economicsocio-economic impact. 2. The number of companiescompanies created. 3. The number of jobsjobs created. 4. The potential economiceconomic growth.
  11. 11. Entrepreneurship Education (CON.( 11 Hospitality educationHospitality education is a link Between the academicacademic and the practicalpractical. Entrepreneurship Education can be encouraged in a meala meal design course or a hotel design coursedesign course or a hotel design course. Entrepreneurship education is a lifelong learning strategylifelong learning strategy that takes many different forms at all levels of education and training.
  12. 12. Some Good Examples 12 UK  Finland: Entrepreneurship education in the national curriculum. Spain: Secondary school students run import & export mini- companies.  Denmark and Sweden: Entrepreneurship education strategy was developed by different governments.
  13. 13. Other Good Examples 13 the University of Cambridgethe University of Cambridge • One example of entrepreneurship education can be found at CornellCornell University (The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University) .
  14. 14. Some Courses at Universities in China 14 Entrepreneurship Management Financial Management Business Plans Leadership Corporations Growth Marketing Management New Product Development Organizational Structure and Design Opportunity and Business Plans for Entrepreneurship Venture Lab and New Venture Creation Source: Lei, J. 2011, 1, 15–18; (in Chinese(. The Practical part is the most important in these courses.
  15. 15. 15
  16. 16. The Task of the Instructor 1. Teaching, Learning, Coaching and Assessment Creating learning environments that encourage entrepreneurial behavior in students now and in the future. Designing curricula with learning outcomes . Enabling students to relate their learning to their subject or industry context and to personal aspirations. Be a leader who is able to shape the opportunity-based learning environment. Engaging external communities and find suitable practical contexts to enhance the learning experience. Engaging entrepreneurs to enhance learning opportunities. 16
  17. 17. The Task of the Instructor (CON.( 2. From Case Studies to Practical Situations Educators enable students to shift from an abstracted study of the past to developing knowledge and skills that help them adapt to changing and future environments. 3. From Problems Analysis to Innovation and Creation in Solving and Facing Problems Educators enable students to shift from critical analysis of abstract problems towards an approach based on innovative and creative thinking. This makes them better equipped to tackle future scenarios.  Coaching to guide students to solutions. 17
  18. 18. The Task of the Instructor (CON.( 4. From Traditional learning (Listening) to Active learning (Discussions, workshops, Seminars) Educators enable students to shift from traditional learning (( receiving knowledge).). Towards participation through ((discussion with employers, educators and peers, or through workshops).). 5. From Fearing Failure to learning from Failure 6. From Dependency to Self-Confidence Educators encourage students to develop self-independence and confidence, which will help them to address issues and problems in strategic ways. 18
  19. 19. 19
  20. 20. 20 •Entrepreneurship education can be implemented in all types of organizations, from public schools , colleges , universities, and more.
  21. 21. Positive Outcomes for Students 21 Effective entrepreneurship education prepares people to be responsibleresponsible, enterprising individuals who become entrepreneursentrepreneurs or thinkers.
  22. 22. Positive Outcomes for Students (CON.) 22 WealthWealth and a high majority of jobsjobs are created by small businesses that became big businesses. Entrepreneurship education helps People have more opportunity to exercise creative freedomscreative freedoms, higher self-self- confidenceconfidence, and an overall greater sense of controlcontrol over their own lives. There is a significant relationship between entrepreneurshipentrepreneurship and employability.employability.
  23. 23. Positive Outcomes for Students (CON.( 23 Helping students recognize opportunitiesopportunities to create and build something from practically nothingnothing.  Enabling students to have self- employment optionsself- employment options as well as those involving working for others.  Encouraging big dreamsdreams & buildbuild skillsskills.  Enabling students to catch the vision, see the opportunity, and create a way to use their talents and skillsto use their talents and skills.
  24. 24. Positive Outcomes for Students (CON.( 24 Increasing a sense of control over their own lives.  Greater awareness of personal talents and skills.  Improving school attendance. Higher academic achievement.  Appling enhanced creativity skills in business situations. Handling business situations.  Using problem solving skills effectively.
  25. 25. Positive Outcomes for Students (CON.) 25 Enhancing awareness of career. Expanding awareness of entrepreneurs contribution to society & economy.  Enhancing basic financial skills. Greater chance of graduating to next education level.  Applying basic marketing skills easily in business situations.
  26. 26. Positive Outcomes for Students (CON.) 26 Applying principles of human relations management. speaking the language of business and entrepreneurship. Using communication and planning skills to write business plans.  Managing risks. Understanding steps essential in business startup. Using math and communications skills through applications. Applying computer skills in business applications.
  27. 27. 27 Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education
  28. 28. Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education 28 1. Comprehensive Curriculum Delivery 2. Risk Management
  29. 29. Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education (CON.) 29 3. Basic Academic Skills Using entrepreneurship to demonstrate the importance of academic skills, including math, communications, digital skills, technology, and more. 4. Economic Concepts The relationship between risk and reward in the entrepreneurial process. Providing opportunities to understand basic economic concepts such as savings, interest, supply, demand, and more.
  30. 30. Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education (CON.( 30 5. Business Planning Students should be able to develop a comprehensive business plan that addresses its financial, marketing, and operational aspects. 6. Ethical Behavior Organizations should be operated in a legal, ethical, and socially and environmentally responsible manner.
  31. 31. Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education (CON.) 31 7. Entrepreneurship as an Economic Force 8. Practical Learning Entrepreneurs are not born. It is necessary to Provide hands-on learning opportunities where students actively learn by doing.
  32. 32. Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education (CON.) 32 9. Problem-Based Learning Students should learn how to be good problem-solvers. Curriculum should provide the opportunity to solve both simple and complex problems. Activities should include challenges with and without clear solutions. 10. Students as Leaders Such student-directed activities may include planning, creating, and operating businesses, field trips, negotiation exercises, and group problem-solving.
  33. 33. Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education (CON.) 33 11. People in the Community Involving individuals from the surrounding community to serve as guest speakers, mentors, advisors, and role models. 12. Variety of Methods Including books, seminars, research, group learning, role-playing, and more.
  34. 34. Methods for Delivering Entrepreneurship Education(CON.) 34 13. Supporting Individuals With the resources, training, guidance, and encouragement needed to maximize success. 14. Continuous Improvement Measuring and evaluating programs and learning outcomes.
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. 36 1.Common mistakes about Entrepreneurs 2. Why Many Small Businesses Fail?
  37. 37. 1.Common Mistakes about Entrepreneurs 37 Entrepreneurs are born, not made. Money is the successful key. You have to be young to be an entrepreneur. You must have a degree in business to be an entrepreneur.
  38. 38. 2.Why Many Small Businesses Fail? 38 Poor planning Poor commitment Poor Leadership  Ethical Failure Poor financial Control Lack of Experience
  39. 39. Future Recommendations 39
  40. 40. 40

×